Postdoctoral Fellow

first_imgSocial Media, Natural Language Processing and PublicHealthCollaborators: Mark Dredze ([email protected])Social media has been show to contain valuable insights into thehealth of populations. Mark Dredze’s research has exploredapplications of social media analysis to a wide range of publichealth domains. This project will investigate such applications bydeveloping new machine learning and NLP algorithms for miningsocial media data.Semantic Parsing / Event RecognitionCollaborators: Benjamin Van Durme ([email protected]), MarkDredze, Kyle RawlinsThere are multiple ongoing efforts at JHU led by Benjamin Van Durmedealing with semantic parsing / event recognition from texts.Targets of extraction include sentences, documents, images, audio,video, in both English and other languages. Applicants to thisposition must have some familiarity with models for Neural MachineTranslation, Information Extraction, and/or Semantic Parsing.Candidates must have a desire to assume a leadership role, and becomfortable working in groups.Analysis of Clinical Medical TextCollaborators: Mark Dredze ([email protected])Extracting information about patients from medical records can helpimprove treatments, and identify important trends in a patientpopulation. Much of this information is contained within clinicaltexts. This project will investigate information extraction toolsfor the extraction of structured information from clinical freetext.Broadly Multilingual Learning of Morphology and Low-ResourceMachine TranslationCollaborators: David Yarowsky, Jason Eisner, SanjeevKhudanpurThis project includes a wide range of problems in computationalmorphology and machine translation of over 800 low-resourcelanguages. We will address a very large and diverse set of worldlanguages using a broad spectrum of approaches, over largeannotated and unannotated datasets of both text and speech.Computational linguists, formal morphologists and specialists inmachine translation and machine learning of human language are allwelcome. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in a relevant discipline and a strongresearch record. Applicants are not required to be to US citizensor permanent residents.Questions about specific projects should be directed to the contactinformation associated with the project.Application instructions : Applicants should apply at:http://apply.interfolio.com/71300Applications consist of a CV and contact information for 3recommenders who can supply letters on request. You do not need tospecify a specific project of interest.Questions? [email protected] Johns Hopkins University is committed to equal opportunity forits faculty, staff, and students. To that end, the university doesnot discriminate on the basis of sex, gender, marital status,pregnancy, race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age,disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity orexpression, veteran status or other legally protectedcharacteristic. The university is committed to providing qualifiedindividuals access to all academic and employment programs,benefits and activities on the basis of demonstrated ability,performance and merit without regard to personal factors that areirrelevant to the program involved.The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm The Center for Language and Speech Processing (CLSP) at the JohnsHopkins University seeks applicants for postdoctoral fellowshippositions in speech, natural language processing and machinelearning.CLSP is one of the world’s largest academic centers focused onspeech and language. CLSP is home to a dozen faculty members, halfa dozen postdocs, and over 60 graduate students. It has a historyof placing students in top academic and industry positions, with alarge network of alumni at Google, Amazon, Microsoft Research,Bloomberg, IBM Research, Facebook, Twitter, Nuance, BBN, andnumerous startups.Johns Hopkins University is a private university located inBaltimore, Maryland. With its cultural heritage, rich history, andunique neighborhoods, Baltimore is a city with something to offereveryone. Visit this site tolearn more about Baltimore.The center has a number of postdoctoral positions available. Asingle application will be considered for all open positions(except for one position as noted below). You need not indicate aspecific position, but you may include a strong preference in anoptional cover letter.last_img read more

Wolf Administration Previews 2018 Southeast Region Construction Season, Highlights 150 Projects

first_img Infrastructure,  Press Release,  Transportation King of Prussia, PA –  Governor Tom Wolf and Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) Secretary Leslie S. Richards today highlighted transportation investments as PennDOT announced that roughly 155 highway and bridge projects are anticipated to begin or continue across the five-county Philadelphia region during this construction season.Richards also urged motorists to drive cautiously in work zones – for their safety and that of workers – in observance of National Work Zone Awareness Week running April 9-13.“We’re improving mobility and economies across the state and I look forward to continuing these important investments in 2018,” Governor Wolf said.Complementing the significant projects in the southeast region, Governor Wolf recently reinforced the administration’s commitment to rural roads with new plans to improve more than 1,100 rural and low-volume roadway miles and rehabilitate or replace at least 85 municipally owned bridges over five years.Today’s announcement was made near the Interstate 95 Girard Avenue/Aramingo Avenue Interchange project in Philadelphia where PennDOT has invested more than $500 million torebuild and improve 1.5 miles of the interstate between the Girard Avenue and Allegheny Avenue interchanges.“The work that we and our municipal and private-sector partners are doing for Pennsylvanians is important for communities and businesses,” Richards said. “Motorists should use caution in work zones so we can get home each day after completing this critical work.”Across PennDOT Engineering District 6, spanning Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia counties, the department anticipates rehabilitating, reconstructing and resurfacing more than 277 miles of state highways and improving 41 bridges.“The aggressive approach we take with our construction program in this region allows us to significantly reduce the backlog of our pavement and bridge demands, and move critical projects forward to improve, strengthen and secure our vast transportation network,” District 6 Executive Kenneth M. McClain said.Notable projects that will continue this year include:Interstate 95 pavement restoration in Bucks County ($29.6 million);U.S. 202 Bridges over Amtrak in Chester County ($26.4 million);U.S. 322 widening in Delaware County ($62.7 million);U.S. 422 Bridges in Montgomery County ($97.4 million); andI-95 Betsy Ross Bridge/Aramingo Interchange improvement in Philadelphia ($81 million).Notable projects that are expected to be begin this year include:U.S. 1 reconstruction in Bucks County ($90 million estimate);U.S. 30 ITS enhancement in Chester County ($7 million estimate);Route 252 bridge replacement over Crum Creek in Delaware County ($16 million estimate);U.S. 202 widening and intersection improvements in Montgomery County ($58 million estimate); andI-95 South Reconstruction between Allegheny Avenue and Columbia Avenue in Philadelphia ($311.5 million).As construction projects are underway in the region, the traveling public can anticipate seeing many work zones and are urged to keep in mind their safety and the safety of highway workers. Preliminary statewide PennDOT data shows that 19 people were killed in work-zone crashes in 2017, three more than in 2016. Additionally, there were 1,789 crashes in work zones last year, a decrease from 2,077 crashes in 2016. Over the last five years, there was a statewide average of 1,901 crashes and nearly 20 fatalities in work zones.In addition to the crash data from police reports, PennDOT monitors work-zone safety with internal reports. In 2017, there were 95 intrusions in PennDOT work zones. Of those work-zone intrusions, 18 resulted in injures to PennDOT employees, 53 caused damage to PennDOT fleet or equipment, and 35 did not result in injury or damage.As of March 9, there have been seven instances of vehicles intruding into work zones in 2018. One resulted in employee injury, four caused damage to vehicles or equipment, and two did not result in injury or damage. Since 1970, 88 PennDOT employees have lost their lives in the line of duty, the latest being Robert Gensimore, a Blair County foreman who was struck on February 17 while placing flares to warn motorists of a crash.More information on work-zone safety is available at www.penndot.gov/safety.For more information on projects occurring or being bid this year, those made possible by or accelerated by the state transportation funding plan (Act 89), or those on the department’s Four and Twelve Year Plans, visit www.projects.penndot.gov.A list of weekly road restrictions and PennDOT maintenance operations in the five-county Philadelphia region is available by visiting the District 6 Traffic Bulletin at www.penndot.gov/District6.For more PennDOT information, visit www.penndot.gov. Follow local PennDOT information on Twitter at www.twitter.com/511PAPhilly. Wolf Administration Previews 2018 Southeast Region Construction Season, Highlights 150 Projects April 06, 2018center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more