Chorney Calls it Like She Sees It

first_imgBy John BurtonFor those who ever wondered Who the f&*$ is Linda Chorney? the question has been answered by Chorney herself.Chorney, a veteran of the music scene for more than three decades – and a nominee for a 2012 Grammy Award that stirred some controversy at the time – has detailed her life and music career.She’s written about knocking around small clubs around the country, staying true to her artistic vision, working on independently produced albums and offers what she said is the backstory of the fallout she experienced following her Grammy nomination last year.The now 53-year-old singer-songwriter called her book a sort of Moneyball with the current music industry filling in for baseball.“It’s an adventure where you can experience what it was like to be in my shoes as a 51-year-old woman who played in bars for 30 years, trying to make it in this business,” she said.The book concentrates on Chorney’s experiences surrounding her Grammy nomination, her unconventional campaign to garner the nomination and the alleged backlash she experienced.She said she wrote the book “because the truth needs to come out. The real story was never told.”Chorney, who lived in Sea Bright for a number of years with husband Scott Fadynich and still owns a home there, was nominated but did not win in 2012 for Best Americana Album, for her sixth and most recent album, Emotional Jukebox. She was nominated in the category with Lucinda Williams and Emmylou Harris and others. As an independent artist, Chorney took an unconventional route to win the nomination by lobbying votes from young members of the Recording Academy, which awards the Grammys, using social media, asking them to vote by way of the Grammy website.Her methods were met by a resistance, she charged, by music industry insiders who felt Chorney had “gamed the system” to push her work. The real motivation, she alleged, was that some of “the suits” in the music business felt challenged by her strategy. Her work, she insisted, speaks for itself and that’s what won her the nomination, despite all the backbiting she said she experienced.“The story should have been a feel-good Cinderella story,” she said. “Unfortun­ately, the industry did not like that they were not profiting off of my nomination.”With the help of her husband and the financial support of friend Dr. Jonathan Schneider, Chorney said she was able to put out an album she felt was truly a quality product – with the necessary production finesse for the Grammys to take seriously.Following her nomination, Chorney was contacted by an industry insider, someone she has dubbed “Mr. Grammy­gate,” who called, “telling me the secrets of the AMA (Association of Americana Album),” she said.“I kept thinking this story is crazy and I have to write about it,” she said, documenting this in Who the F&*$ is Linda Chorney? “There’s a lot of dirty stuff that goes on there.”About that title, by the way? “It could be who the fork. It could be who funk or who the fish, or whoever you want,” she said, clearly having a little fun with it. She did warn, however, anyone offended by “f-bombs” might not want to read her book.For those who are struggling to make it in a very tough business, Chorney said, her work can offer some advice to avoid some of the pitfalls she’s experienced and to understand the need to keep playing.“If you’re good, you’re good,” she said, “and believe in yourself, believe in your art.”Chorney, now lives in Tucson, Ariz., where she and her husband moved to be near Chorney’s family as her mother battled – and beat – cancer. She is currently touring New England, promoting her book and work and is working on a new album, tentatively slated for a holiday release.She also is working on another book, that will chronicle her attempts to track down filmmaker Cameron Crowe (Almost Famous, Say Anything) to convince him to adopt the book for the movies.last_img read more

Giants hitting coach embraces evolving job in modern baseball

first_imgSCOTTSDALE, Ariz.–The hours are grueling, the attention to detail is exhausting and the potential for long-term stability is lacking.A hitting coach’s schedule doesn’t end when the season concludes, either. It may not be a 365-day per year job, but thanks to the advent of new technology and ever-increasing stakes, it is close to a daily, year-round endeavor.“I think probably in the last eight years, it’s become more of a full-time thing,” Giants hitting coach Alonzo Powell said of his job. …last_img read more

Coega Dairy ‘coup’ for emerging farmers

first_img26 November 2012South African franchise restaurant group Famous Brands has entered into a joint venture partnership with the Coega Dairy Company, a dairy manufacturing business owned by local farmers, factory and farm employees, to supply mozzarella, cheese slices and cheese spread to the Group.The agreement will see R55-million being invested in a new state-of-the-art cheese manufacturing plant next to Coega Dairy’s existing facility at the Coega industrial development zone outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape.At the same time, it will create new jobs and provide black farmer supplying the Coega Dairy with a new and growing market for their produce.According to the Coega Development Corporation (CDC), Famous Brands will control 51% of the shares of the joint venture company, the Famous Brands Cheese Manufacturing Company, with Coega Dairy shareholders holding the balance of 49%.State-of-the-art cheese manufacturing plant“In terms of the agreement, a new state-of-the-art cheese manufacturing plant will be constructed adjacent to Coega Dairy’s existing dairy facility (whose primary business is the production of UHT longlife milk and butter),” the CDC said in a statement on Monday.Latest-technology equipment, budgeted at R35-million, will be imported from Italy for the custom-designed plant, to be funded by the joint venture partners in direct proportion to their shareholding in the business, the CDC said.The CDC will fund the R20-million construction of the 2 600 square metre facility and lease the premises to the new company, while Coega Diary will manage the day-to-day operations of the cheese manufacturing business for an agreed management fee.“Famous Brands Cheese Manufacturing Co is anticipated to commence supply and distribution of mozzarella cheese to the Debonairs Pizza franchise network in May 2013,” the CDC said, adding that the business’s first-year annualised turnover was expected to be in the order of R180-million.‘Fantastic coup for the farmers’Famous Brands CEO Kevin Hedderwick said in a statement that the partnership was “compelling for two reasons: the transaction comprises a straightforward greenfield investment with significant earnings potential and a short payback period.“And equally importantly, it is an enterprise which will deliver tremendous benefits for those black farmers who partner with us via Coega Dairy, whereby they gain an instant, robust market for their milk, and the potential to grow that market over time.”Hedderwick added that the partnership was expected to create 49 jobs in the new cheese manufacturing company, as well as a further five jobs in the existing Coega Dairy business.Coega Dairy CEO Hennie Kleynhans said described the transaction as “a fantastic coup for the farmers who own Coega Dairy. It guarantees a market for at least 38-million litres of milk per annum, and will in time establish the dairy as one of the biggest in South Africa.”SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

SME Indaba calls for business investment in South Africa

first_imgThe first SME Indaba organised by AHI South Africa discussed why big and small businesses should work together.Former deputy minister of finance Mcebisi Jonas (left) and AHI South Africa president Bernard Swanepoel. Jonas was a speaker at the SME Indaba on 5 April 2017. He says bringing small and big business together is a powerful tool. (Image: Melissa Javan)Melissa JavanPay invoices on time, AHI South Africa president Bernard Swanepoel challenged owners of big corporates, the government and members of his organisation. “Think small [businesses] first. Consider the effects on small and medium enterprises (SMEs).”Swanepoel gave the welcoming address of AHI South Africa’s first SME Indaba, held in Centurion on 5 April 2017. The theme of the one-day conference was “Creating jobs against all odds”.Swanepoel’s second challenge was that his members commit this year to creating two entry level jobs. “Take your business and create a job.”He added: “If there is no growth in your business, it will die. You cannot stagnate as a business… Invest in your businesses. Invest in the future of the country.”Businesses, get involvedFormer deputy minister of finance Mcebisi Jonas was the keynote speaker. He said the future of the country was in South Africans’ hands. “We need to strengthen leadership.”There was a need for the business sector to be involved in and to collaborate with government programmes, especially when it came to training emerging entrepreneurs, he said.Jonas also urged businesses to invest in doing research so that relevant training could be given to students. Businesses should go to where students who needed relevant industry training were, in colleges and universities.Members should not underestimate the power of an organisation such as the AHI, he said. “[An organisation like this] can provide a stronger network of enterprises. Bringing small and big business together is a powerful tool.“You can see how you can use the supply chain to promote growth – you enhance growth where there is an organisation of big and small business.”The AHI is a national multisectoral, inclusive business organisation consisting of corporate, medium and small enterprises and affiliated business chambers. It represents more than 100 business chambers, more than 4,000 businesses and has trained 740 entrepreneurs, it says.The AHI’s mission is to promote the economic and business interests of its members and to facilitate networks and interaction between businesses and the government.DowngradeAsked about South Africa being downgraded to junk status by ratings agency S&P Global Ratings on 5 April, Jonas said: “We will bounce back as a country but it will require that we become more robust. We need to boost things such as our agricultural programmes and other programmes that are working.”He added: “We need to do more about scaling.”A national dialogue was needed so we could talk about where we should be going as a country. “I fear that if we don’t have a national dialogue we’ll be replacing the white elite with the black elite. That is not right.”Chief executive officer of AHI South Africa, Dr. Ernest Messina, Prof. Edith Vries of the Department: Small Business Development and Ashraf Adam of the South Africa Local Government Association are panellists discussing “How national and local governments enable or stifle SMEs” at the SME Indaba on 5 April 2017. (Image: Melissa Javan)SMMEs’ challengesBusiness Unity South Africa (Busa) had found the number one barrier for many SMEs was access to skilled staff, said Tanya Cohen, the organisation’s CEO. She spoke about the challenges SMEs faced.Skills training and relevant transformation was necessary, said Cohen. It was important that the South African economy was open to all. “We need to do this; [South Africa must be] inclusive of black people, women, people with disabilities and those living in rural areas.”Cohen also spoke about the country’s minimum wage and its effect on SMMEs. A quarter of small, medium and micro enterprises were able to afford the minimum wage, but three-quarters of SMMEs “are going to struggle to pay [it]”.Negotiations were ongoing to exempt SMMEs from paying the minimum wage. “It’s something that we will have to continue to motivate for.”It was Busa’s mission to secure conditions so that business could thrive, Cohen said. “Our focus is what we can do for business.”Other discussionsEntrepreneurs on the panel “Negotiating the minefield of regulation and bureaucracy affecting SMEs”, had advice for businesses:Paul Marias: “My best investment advice is read, read and read. Also comply with the legislation.”Octavia Motloa: “A lot of people think that if they are a small business they can do mediocre work. No, it shouldn’t be. The quality of your work must be exceptional. As you excel in that it creates opportunities.”Annie Malan: “Continuously ask yourself ‘how do I re-evaluate myself?’ You have to stay ahead [of the game].” Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

Cape Town is infected with public art

first_img30 January 2015Cape Town’s city bowl will be transformed into an entrancing outdoor art gallery and theatre – where there is always something to catch the eye and performances are free – during Infecting The City.It’s a vibrant and innovative annual public arts festival that “strives to bring exceptional, socially engaged performance and visual art out of theatres and galleries and into the communal spaces of Cape Town’s central business district – transforming the city centre into an outdoor venue, where art is free and accessible to everyone”, say the organisers.Infecting The City runs from 9 to 14 March this year, with the art happening along specific routes through the CBD. There are daytime and night time routes, appealing to office-hours workers and night-time party people, as well as pieces that pop up unexpectedly across the city.Some of the routes are planned around hubs of activity – “central spaces that will be activated for the whole day with various installations, participatory artworks and performances”. And beyond the scheduled performances, artworks run throughout the festival; there are also artworks that are mobile, without time or place, and can only be experienced if stumbled upon.All performances are free; the principal partners are the national Department of Arts and Culture, Spier and the City of Cape Town.“Whether you are an active participant or more detached observer, whether you participate in a route as a planned activity or come across a moment of performance in your everyday use of the city, the hope is that you will be able to engage with the spaces of Cape Town in ways that will be transformed by your experience of public art,” says the organisers.Infecting The City 2015, they add, has been designed to be fun and entertaining, as well as politically charged and challenging. It features South African artists, as well as artists from the rest of the continent and abroad.Programme highlightsThe programme includes Living Room Dancers by Swiss choreographer Nicole Seilers. Audiences are invited to view dancers through binoculars as they dance simultaneously in the windows of a block of flats.Johannesburg artist Sandile Radebe’s Colour Me In presents an old city map that includes the lines of racial segregation and asks the viewers to redraw and colour in the city they want to see.Nicola Elliot, the recipient of the Standard Bank Young Artist Award for Dance in 2014, presents Chalk. It explores how the delineation of chalk can change meaning. A few players meet to have a “very ordinary” dance-game within the unstable demarcations of a shifting and busy section of the Cape Town CBD.Jacqueline Manyaapelo and Khayalethu Witbooi ask some important questions about South Africa’s education system in UnEducated. Berlin artist Hilla Steinert and Elize Vossgatter, from Cape Town, make connections in The Braid by plaiting a braid using grasses they have collected. Audience members are invited to contribute materials to plait into the braid.An Africa Centre initiative, Badilisha Poetry X-Change is both an online audio archive and a Pan-African poetry show delivered in radio format. The largest online collective of African poets on the planet, Badilisha has showcased and archived over 350 Pan- African poets from 24 countries.For Infect The City, it takes a poetic expedition to unearth Cape Town’s lesser- known stories. The guided walkabout attempts to add new perspectives, insights, narratives, rhythm and rhyme to the temperament of a city that is known for its tensions and its possibilities. Cape Town poets Blaq Pearl, Genna Gardini, Khadija Tracey Heeger, Kyle Louw and Mbongeni Nomkonwana have been commissioned to write poems that will speak directly to a selection of themes including education, transportation and homelessness.Photographer and filmmaker Brent Meistre, the winner of the first Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Museum’s Biennale exhibition, presents Analogue Eye: Video Art Africa, Mobile Drive-in & Pop-up Cinema.It pays homage to the traditional drive-in experience and early projectionists such as Sol Plaatjie who, travelling across South Africa, took the moving image to the people. Analogue Eye takes video works from the gallery to meet a wider audience in unexpected public platforms and spaces. Video Art Africa is a curated screening consisting of three programmes of diverse video artworks by 37 artists about, from or on the African continent.Other works explore social issues and events such as Marikana and the 2014 kidnapping of 273 girls in Nigeria, and other artists include Zee Hartmann; Wojciech Gilewicz; Sanjin Muftić; Siphumeze Khundayi, Sonia Radebe and Sethembile Msezane; Vincent Chomaz; Velvet Spine; Wesley Pepper; Luthando Mthi; New World Dance Theatre; New Moon Collective; Rhodes University Fine Art Department; Jazzart Dance Theatre; Jnr; and Lesiba Mabitsela.Infecting The City is a project of the Africa Centre, an international centre for creativity, artistic excellence and intellectual engagement that uses “Pan-African cultural practice as a tool to: manifest what otherwise would only sit in our imaginations; release new ideas and make them freely accessible to receptive audiences; and ensure that people living on this soil can define for themselves what is possible and what their reality looks like”, it says on its website.Its other programmes include Artists in Residency, Everyday African Urbanism, Talking Heads and WikiAfrica, all of which “celebrate and encapsulate what it means to be in Africa today and what is conceivable for 21st-century Africans”.last_img read more

Nira Radia claims threat from an advocate

first_imgCorporate lobbyist Nira Radia met CBI director A.P. Singh on Wednesday to complain about a “blackmail” threat she had received from a lawyer. Sources said Radia complained that a lawyer was threatening to “expose” her.Radia is a CBI witness in the 2G scam and has had a run-in with former MP and lawyer R.K. Anand, the sale of whose controversial book on her was banned by the high court recently. But a CBI official said the lawyer she complained about was not Anand.The lawyer allegedly told her that he would provide documents to the CBI which could nail her. She met Singh at his North Block office, though it was a bit out of line for somebody to directly meet the director on a matter like this.Radia is listed as witness number 44 among over 125 witnesses, including former bureaucrats of the telecom department, honchos of private companies and attorney general G. Vahanvati.The CBI refused to make any official statement on her meeting apart from confirming it.For more news on India, click here.For more news on Business, click here.For more news on Movies, click here.For more news on Sports, click here.last_img read more

Grambling’s Shakyla Hill gets 2nd career quadruple-double

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants Giannis Antetokounmpo goes 17/17 at free throw line, powers Bucks past Wizards View comments FILE – In this Friday, March 16, 2018 file photo, Baylor’s Lauren Cox, left, and Moon Ursin (12) defend as Grambling State guard Shakyla Hill (5) handles the ball in the second half of a first-round game at the NCAA women’s college basketball tournament in Waco, Texas. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)GRAMBLING, La. — Shakyla Hill became the first player in NCAA history with two career quadruple-doubles, finishing with 21 points, 16 rebounds, 13 assists and 10 steals Saturday night in Grambling State’s 77-57 victory over Arkansas-Pine Bluff.The senior guard got her first one nearly 13 months ago on Jan. 3, 2018, against Alabama State. That was only the fourth one accomplished in NCAA Division I history.ADVERTISEMENT For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. The other official quad-double was by Ramona Jones of Lamar against Central Florida on Jan. 14, 1991. ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes MOST READ Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war Hill got her 10th steal with 52 seconds left.“I am just so blessed,” Hill said. “To be able to record a quadruple-double once was something special, but to do it again, words cannot describe how I am feeling. I want to thank my teammates for the support and helping me achieve this record.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesBefore Hill’s achievement last year, the last quadruple-double was by Soja Tate of Arkansas State against Mississippi Valley State on Jan. 27, 1993. Tate had 29 points, 14 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals.Veronica Pettry of Loyola Chicago had 12 points, 10 rebounds, 22 assists and 11 steals for the first official quadruple-double on Jan. 14, 1989. Steals didn’t become an official NCAA stat until 1987-88 and assists became an official stat just two years earlier. SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte LATEST STORIES ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woeslast_img read more

Minister Shaw Calls for Fair and Rigorous Application of Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas

first_img “Therefore, we need to commit ourselves first and foremost to applying the existing rules and strengthen (measures), where necessary, to achieve the goal of a single market,” he said. Story Highlights Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Audley Shaw, says that the provisions of the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas must be applied fairly and rigorously in order to result in increased economic development in the region.“Therefore, we need to commit ourselves first and foremost to applying the existing rules and strengthen (measures), where necessary, to achieve the goal of a single market,” he said.Mr. Shaw was contributing to a debate on the Report of the Commission to Review Jamaica’s Relations within the CARICOM and CARIFORUM Frameworks in the House of Representatives on June 19.The Revised Treaty establishing the Caribbean Community, including the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME) was signed in 2001.Among the objectives are improved standard of living and work in member countries; accelerated, coordinated and sustained economic development; and organisation for increased production and productivity.Mr. Shaw told the House that he supports the Commission’s recommendation that calls for the removal of all non-tariff barriers and establishment of agreed protocols for sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures.He said that agreed mechanisms relating to SPS issues are critical to facilitate trade in agriculture, which, he noted, forms an important part of the economic and social fabric of most CARICOM states.He noted that while Jamaica has emerged as the “single” market that everyone wants to access, “we have experienced significant challenges in accessing the CARICOM market, largely on the grounds of SPS measures”.“We must, therefore, accelerate every effort to have the necessary harmonised SPS measures in place as recommended by the Commission Report,” Mr. Shaw said.He noted that Jamaica has achieved self-sufficiency in a number of agricultural goods, including chicken, eggs, pork and several vegetables and tubers, and any further expansion of productive capacity will only be possible with access to nearshore preferential markets.He said Jamaica sees CARICOM as a natural extension of its domestic market and will be aggressively pursuing this market, “as we not only have the capacity to do so but we have a right as enshrined in the Revised Treaty”.Minister Shaw noted that there is also opportunity to grow agriculture to supply raw material for manufacturing.“Again, the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas, through the provisions of the Common External Tariff and Rules of Origin provisions, is intended to foster primary agricultural production to support manufacturing. This is precisely why the Revised Treaty promotes trade in wholly produced primary goods and sets thresholds to ensure value addition and substantial transformation,” he pointed out.He said that the practice has been wholesale and liberal use of extra-regional raw materials with little value-added, to produce manufactured goods in the region and then ship to countries, including Jamaica, duty-free.“All of this is happening when Jamaica itself has the capacity to produce some of those very raw materials. I, therefore, call on CARICOM, through the Council for Trade and Economic Development (COTED), to rigorously apply these rules,” he appealed.He argued that where countries demonstrate the capacity to produce the raw materials “the rules need to recognise this, with the adequate tariff protection and by lifting the threshold for transformation”.“For instance, it is an affront to the peanut farmer in Jamaica not to be able to sell his peanuts when a manufacturing entity elsewhere in CARICOM can simply put a pretty package on extra-regional peanuts and sell it to our markets as a product of community origin duty-free,” he further contended.Mr. Shaw stressed that for the Caribbean Single Market to be effective and sustainable it has to promote the development of primary industries. Mr. Shaw was contributing to a debate on the Report of the Commission to Review Jamaica’s Relations within the CARICOM and CARIFORUM Frameworks in the House of Representatives on June 19. Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Audley Shaw, says that the provisions of the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas must be applied fairly and rigorously in order to result in increased economic development in the region.last_img read more

Siewert says Huddersfield cannot compete with Chelsea

first_imgHuddersfield Town is in the last place of the English Premier League table and couldn’t even compete with Chelsea at Stamford Bridge.Huddersfield Town is dead-last in the English Premier League table with only 11 points after 25 matches.The team has only won twice, drawing five times and losing in 18 games.They are candidates to get demoted into the English Championship at the end of the 2018-2019 season.And after they were defeated 5-0 by giants Chelsea today, Huddersfield manager Jan Siewert says his team cannot compete.“We tried everything to beat them but they showed they are also very hungry because of their defeat against Bournemouth,” he told Sky Sports after today’s 5-0 defeat.“We missed several moments when we could have shot.”Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.“It’s possible to threaten but you have to shoot. Sometimes the ball goes for a corner or goes to goal, which is the important thing,” he commented.“It was a very bad moment for us. We had some chances before and then maybe we could have equalized before half-time and I’m not sure if it was a penalty.”“We have to work as intensely as possible and for my game, you need the right shape for that,” Siewert added.“To be intense and defend at the front is the most important thing. We have to work hard and continue.”“It’s definitely a test of character. Our fans were fantastic and we have to show that we are willing to win games,” the manager concluded.The team doesn’t have it easy.The next Saturday they will host Arsenal, only to visit Newcastle United and then receive the visit of Wolverhampton Wanderers.last_img read more