Edge Data Centers: The Promise and the Peril

first_imgThe following is a guest post from Michael Kanellos of OSIsoft a member of Dell’s Internet of Things (IoT) Solutions Partner Program.Where we put computing assets changes with the times.In the 1950s and 1960s, computers were housed in centralized rooms. Desktops distributed computing power across organizations in the 1980s. Then, ten years ago, the cloud began to gain momentum and you saw companies shut down their own data centers and migrate applications to data centers that rivaled the Pentagon in size.But guess what: the next counter reaction is already underway. Companies are discovering that trying to migrate all of your applications to the cloud generates bandwidth congestion, latency and cost. The recent attacks on some large data centers have also pointed up the risks of centralization.Edge data centers—i.e. modular pods containing half rack to four racks of computing equipment along with the necessary power and cooling systems–won’t replace clouds. Instead, they will supplement them, particularly when it comes to the Internet of Things. An edge data center could be installed at an offshore wind farm to conduct predictive analytics or manage equipment. Intel, among others, estimates that 40 percent of IoT data will never make it to a centralized data center: it will be consumed, analyzed and stored where it was generated with only necessary snapshots of performance or critical data streams being sent to headquarters.Similarly, carriers can locate them in metropolitan neighborhoods to cache videos or other content to improve service. Some early market forecasts predict that edge data centers could become a $6.8 billion business by 2020.But here’s the rub. How do you manage thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of servers spread across a geographic region? This is the challenge OSIsoft and Dell EMC’s Extreme Scale Infrastructure (ESI) division have set out to solve. You know who Dell EMC is, and its ESI division delivers tailored solutions to large, scale-out markets like carriers and service providers. OSIsoft is probably less familiar but there’s a good chance you’re using our software as you read. We produce software that helps utilities and other large organizations capture and organize data from transformers, oil drilling platforms, production equipment, pumps and other devices. Water utilities use our PI System to help predict demand (or prepare for floods) while brewers use it to maintain an even fermentation across their beers.Dell EMC ESI and OSIsoft are developing best practices for integrating the PI System into its micro Modular Data Centers (MDCs) to monitor electricity consumption, avoid peak power charges, detect early warning signs of failure and other tasks.  This data is collected via a Dell IoT gateway where tier 1 analytics can be applied before sending relevant data to the cloud.  Performance data of fleets of micro MDCs can then be served up to operations dashboards or made available over mobile phones.OSIsoft and Dell EMC have worked together since 2013. The PI System, for instance, is integrated into Dell EMC MDCs deployed by some of the largest cloud providers. The PI System data has helped these customers reduce human error, compare the performance of different modules, automate processes like PUE analysis and make data center commissioning a more repeatable process.A lot of attention is directed to the center, but keep your eyes on the edge. And for those attending Dell EMC World next week, be sure to stop by the Service Provider and Industry Solutions Pavilion to see Dell EMCs micro MDC in person, along with our joint demo that shows operators how they can administer and manage MDCs from all over the world as well as the associated IT from a single point of control.Michael Kanellos is a technology analyst at OSIsoft where his job is to write about the impact IoT will have on our lives. He’s been covering Dell for decades.last_img read more

Saint Mary’s father inspires message of hope

first_imgAs the capstone event of Support a Belle, Love a Belle (SABLAB) week at Saint Mary’s, Tom Seeberg, the father of Elizabeth “Lizzy” Seeberg, addressed the College community in a lecture titled “Believe – Giving Witness to Hope,” in Carroll Auditorium on Thursday evening.Seeberg was a first-year Saint Mary’s student when she committed suicide following an ongoing battle with anxiety and depression. Her death came 10 days after allegations of an Aug. 31, 2010 sexual assault involving former Notre Dame linebacker Prince Shembo. Students said the College community remembers Seeberg as an outgoing, smiling, caring student who loved Saint Mary’s and her fellow Belles.Senior and co-chair of the student government association’s (SGA) social concerns committee Kaitlyn Tarullo said SABLAB started in 2011 partly as response to Seeberg’s suicide.“Her story is extremely important, and we felt like it was an appropriate time to invite Mr. Seeberg back to reflect on his journey a few years later,” Tarullo said. “Hope is an attitude that can start with a daily struggle but then eventually, over time, transforms into a lifestyle.”Tom Seeberg began his talk by reflecting on the Saint Mary’s campus, which he said remains a positive place for him and his family.“It is always awesome to come to this campus, and you might think it wouldn’t be … [but] in the days that, if you will, followed Lizzy’s death, so many wonderful things happened for us,” Seeberg said. “I am honored that you think I can deliver some message of hope to you all … [for] this is such a great and spiritual place for us.”Though he has no professional credentials in speaking on mental health, sexual assault or spirituality, Seeberg said he does have the credentials of being a dad.“I’m Tom Seeberg, but I really love being known as Lizzy’s dad. It’s one of the proudest things anyone could call me,” he said. “And I can assure you that what I tell you about my journey here is not manufactured; the foundation of it came in the immediate days following Lizzy’s death, and the power of those days has never left me.”He said hope, for the Seeberg family, coincides perfectly with the mission of the Holy Cross order, the meaning of Spes Unica and the realization of the difference between little hope and what he called “capital-H Hope.” Before discussing how he found hope, though, Seeberg painted a picture of his loving daughter and Belle, Lizzy.“She was very, very outgoing – you would have to meet her several times before you understood she suffered from an anxiety disorder,” he said. “We became soulmates [and] closer through her struggle. We participated in some therapy together; we became real good buds.“She told us everything. There was never any holding back. Through her bouts of depression, she was always very good at raising the white flag and saying she needed a time-out.”He and his wife, Mary, first began dealing with signs of Lizzy’s anxiety and depression issues when she was in the eighth grade, Seeberg said.“She was going to be dealing with anxiety and depression for the rest of her life,” he said. “Difficult situations for everybody were always going to be more difficult for her … but the thing about Lizzy was, she wanted to get up every day and punch life in the face. She wasn’t going to be denied having a normal life, and [going to] college was an important part of that.”However, after a difficult first semester at the University of Dayton, the Seeberg family decided there must be another alternative for Lizzy to better support her mental health, he said. The alternative was Saint Mary’s, where Lizzy wanted to enroll as a first-year and have a fresh start in college.“She felt she knew more about herself, and she felt very confident [at Saint Mary’s],” he said. “Some of her doctors are on record saying she was as strong and determined as they’d ever seen her. She was very committed to us in saying ‘I’m going to use all my tools and all my resources,’ meaning diet and exercise, the counselors here, her friends [and] us.”However, in the final days of her life, Lizzy Seeberg faced challenges that were beyond her capacity, her father said.“[On September 9th], she went to a sexual assault awareness event, and for whatever reason, I think it hit her, and it all began to unravel and close in,” he said.Following his daughter’s death, Tom Seeberg said there came moments of grace that began to build “capital-H Hope.”“As we were walking the dog [that Sunday], we were talking and saying, ‘Let’s be real about this, something has hit us here that’s the worst possible thing that can happen, and it became this prayer – a simple prayer of ‘God, show us the way. We need this to be our finest hour. We need these next several days to be our finest hour,’” he said.For the Seebergs, the funeral and burial process were dark, but also beautiful, as the “Lizzy spirit” pulled the entire family together, he said.“Over that next week, we saw our faith; we saw hope and love carry us,” Seeberg said. “I was the only one able to make it to the memorial here, [and though] I’ve never been a touchy-feely faith guy, I’ve never been an evangelizer or anything like that … when Caroline Bacchus’ [Lizzy’s former roommate] mom embraced me, it was just incredible. And when we were about ready to walk into the chapel, and there were some 400 folks in there, it was incredibly moving.“And when Carol Mooney handed me Lizzy’s class ring … and said, ‘Once a Belle, always a Belle,’ I just about collapsed. I have to say, it was about the first time in my life I’ve been touched like that.”For Tom Seeberg, this build-up of spiritual moments led him to what he called “getting it.”“The reason why we are here on earth, we can know it intellectually, but I didn’t really get it until then,” he said. “It’s this ability to go beyond ourselves, to cry tears of happiness or tears of grief … it’s to experience love that is transforming.“That’s the big capital-H Hope, and all other hope rests upon that. Light does conquer darkness; life will conquer death, and we will see Lizzy again. And therefore, get about acting as a witness to that belief, and that means doing something. … For us, it meant moving forward, not moving on. Wear the scar – it’ll fade, but wear it for all it means. And do something positive with it.“That’s the spirit in which we’ve been living,” he said. “The reality of Lizzy never leaves me … so hope is where we live. Our prayer in desperation was answered.”In the conclusion of the talk, Seeberg discussed the issues of mental illness and sexual assault on college campuses, wishing for Lizzy to be a symbol of hope in such challenges.With respect to mental illness, Seeberg said he is grateful for an increased awareness of mental health and a decreased stigma compared to 10 years ago.“There’s hope in your efforts in Support a Belle, Love a Belle and Irish State of Mind initiatives. There’s hope in just talking about it,” he said. “There’s hope when people get a little edgy about it. … There’s hope in asking for help. You have to believe that help is available for you if you need it, and there’s hope in the help that’s available.”In regard to sexual assault, Seeberg said from his family’s experience and their approach in prayer, he wishes for an increased awareness of sexual assault support.“We just pray that we serve Lizzy’s memory well with our message and her wishes – which were to help the next woman,” he said. “… Being a gentleman works. And I think in a place where there’s world-class education and academics … world-class facilities and even world-class athletic programs, that we should know and demand for a world-class response to sexual assault.”Seeberg said he believes there is a lot of promise in developing attitudes to the issue of sexual assault, and we are starting to see more of a culture of commitment, but student activism needs to be behind it for it to be fully successful.“You’re not going to change the world by complying with federal regulations, you’re going to change it when students demand better of their institutions,” he said. “I’d like to believe that Lizzy’s name adds to that hope.”Senior Chloe Deranek, co-chair of SGA’s social concerns committee, said Seeberg’s talk perfectly underscored SABLAB’s message of hope for the community in raising awareness of both mental health and sexual assault.“Mr. Seeberg’s message showed students how valuable hope is to have and hold onto and more than that, how to find hope when you are lost without it,” Deranek said. “I think his talk underlined the power of the Saint Mary’s sisterhood and how it extended beyond his daughter to his family as well.”Tarullo said she hopes Lizzy’s story continues to inspire a conversation about mental health issues, for Lizzy is a symbol on campus for continued awareness and support.“Lizzy was, is and will forever be a Belle,” Tarullo said. “You may not know the story behind everyone on campus, but you should know that everyone has a story to tell.“It is my personal hope that people listen to Lizzy’s and Tom’s stories and reflect on their own. Do I model hope in my thoughts, words and actions? Do I seek to bring hope to others in need?”Tags: Irish State of Mind, Lizzy Seeberg, love a belle, Mental health, mental health awareness, mental illness, mr. tom seeberg, SABLAB, seeberg, support a belle, support a belle love a bellelast_img read more

Edward Watts to Join The Fantasticks Cast

first_img Related Shows View Comments The cast of The Fantastics also includes Jim Schubin as The Boy (Matt), Samantha Bruce as The Girl (Luisa), George Lee Andrews as The Boy’s Father (Hucklebee), Donald Corren as The Girl’s Father (Bellomy), MacIntyre Dixon as The Old Actor (Henry), Michael Nostrand as The Man Who Dies (Mortimer) and Pierce Cravens as The Mute. The production also features Scott Willis, Rita Markova, and Tom Flagg. The Fantasticks Directed by Tom Jones, The Fantasticks has a book and lyrics by Jones and music by Harvey Schmidt. A modern twist on Romeo and Juliet, the musical tells the story of a boy and girl who fall in love and then quickly grow apart when they realize they want to experience the world. The Fantasticks features memorable songs “Try to Remember,” “Much More,” “They Were You” and “Soon It’s Gonna Rain.” Show Closed This production ended its run on June 4, 2017 Edward Watts (Scandalous, It’s a Bird…Plane…It’s Superman at Encores!) is joining the cast of The Fantasticks at off-Broadway’s Snapple Theater Center. He will take over from Jeremiah James as the Narrator (El Gallo) on April 28 for a two-week engagement, playing through May 12. The long-running show’s 56th anniversary is on May 3.last_img read more

Wood Mackenzie: ‘Low-risk’ renewables now offer same return as oil and gas projects

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Recharge:Investor payback from wind and solar projects is now competitive with oil and gas as the price for crude languishes at under $25 per barrel (bbl) following the market collapse fueled by the spread of coronavirus — and would be even at $35/bbl, according to analyst group Wood Mackenzie.Before the pandemic, when the price of crude was at $60/bbl, wind and solar projects’ average 5-10% internal rate of return (IRR) “found it difficult to compete with expected double-digit returns” for oil and gas, said Valentina Kretzschmar, vice-president of corporate analysis. But even if the oil market were to rebound, the growing pressure on the sector to commit to net-zero carbon meant renewable energy “presented opportunities for companies with strong balance sheets,” she added.“Our analysis shows that 75% of pre-final investment decision projects globally would return less than the cost of capital, assumed at 10%…Oil and gas projects are now in line with average returns from low-risk solar and wind projects,” WoodMac said in a special note on the impact of coronavirus on the oil and gas sector. “Capital allocation is no longer a one-way street for Big Oil — renewables projects suddenly look as attractive as upstream projects at $35/bbl.”Kretzschmar downplayed notions that the swinging “survival mode” cuts now being made by oil and gas companies to discretionary spending would impact on renewables investments — as many, including the International Energy Agency (IEA), have feared. “Historically, the oil price has shown no correlation with investment in renewables. The installation of both wind and solar continued to increase through the last oil price downturn,” she said.“Oil and gas companies make up a tiny proportion of global investment in renewables. The sector accounts for less than 2% of global solar and wind capacity. Even if Big Oil stopped investing in renewables altogether, that would have a minor impact on growth.”Kretzschmar noted, nonetheless, that in the short-term, the oil and gas sector will “struggle to generate enough cash to maintain operations and honour shareholder commitments” in a sub-$35/bbl industrial landscape, with all discretionary spending “including additional budget allocated for carbon mitigation” being put under review.[Darius Snieckus]More: Investor returns on renewables projects ‘now competitive with oil & gas’ as coronavirus strikes Wood Mackenzie: ‘Low-risk’ renewables now offer same return as oil and gas projectslast_img read more

Colombia’s Army Has Faith in the Cause

first_imgBy Dialogo January 01, 2013 Gen. Navas explained that although the motto “Fe en la Causa” and the supporting campaign is new, the underlying concept of faith in the military and the nation is not. “While the concept for ‘Fe en la Causa’ had not been previously brought out as a motto, it has been a fundamental part of our institution’s daily life,” Gen. Navas said. “The faith that we have and the cause that motivates our actions are not mere new words. They have been implicit in the hearts and minds of our officers, NCOs, and Soldiers forever, and have become part of our philosophy of life.” “We saw the need to convert this concept into a motto that would remind us, under every circumstance and at all times, that if we want to live our lives as military service members, we must be committed to the institution’s mission and therefore, committed to unconditional service to country.” Based on this recognition, the Army devised a three-phase institutional campaign to instill the concept in the hearts of its members as well as in everything they do. The three phases are an instructive, a persuasive, and a sustainment phase through which commitment and faith in the Armed Forces’ mission is deepened, in order to reach victory. As described by Colonel Wilson Torres, deputy director of Integrated Action, the office within the Army’s headquarters charged with leading the instructive phase efforts, the campaign has matured over the last 18 months with the instructive and persuasive phases well underway. The Army expects to enter the sustainment phase in 2014. The first phase consisted of developing a communication plan that would ensure that all members of the Army were informed about the initiative and its goals. From videos and radio spots, to messages in the food packets Soldiers take with them on combat operations in the jungle, the “Fe en la Causa” concept is spread throughout the Army using all communication platforms. The campaign has also reached the Colombian public through the showing of a specially produced video in civilian movie theaters as well as on television during prime viewing hours and radio spots on public radio channels. Public awareness and interest also has been raised through the Army’s website, which has seen an increase in public users accessing “Fe en la Causa” information. In addition to the communication campaign, the Army’s Training and Doctrine command has established a “Fe en la Causa” training program that is included in all levels of professional development. For example, in Tolemaida, the Army’s largest training post, Soldiers go through training where they encounter scenarios designed to challenge their ethics and values. The scenarios are based on events that they could experience in combat. Retraining is done every six months to ensure that Soldiers internalize the concept of superior ethical behavior. General Sergio Mantilla, current Army commander, said the “essence of the campaign is the human resource, our Soldier. This is the most valuable asset of the institution.” Highlighting the importance of the human resource, the Army designed the “Fe en la Causa” medal that is used to recognize Soldiers and civilians whose actions embody the spirit of ethical behavior and dedication to the cause and the nation. To determine the success of the program, the Army is surveying the force every six months to measure Soldier understanding and knowledge of the program, and the degree to which they accept and apply the principals. The Army also tracks the number of “Fe en la Causa” medals awarded; the number of human rights violations or complaints made, if any, during operations; the Soldier desertion rate; and finally, the Army tracks Gallup poll results regarding the civilian opinion of the Military as a profession. So far, the results of these measurements are positive. According to Integrated Action officers, the Army has seen fewer retirements; leaders report a positive influence on Soldiers and their behavior as well as an increase in Soldiers taking on leadership roles; a decrease in the number of complaints by Soldiers and against Soldiers; and a February 2012 Gallup poll had the military rated as the most respected institution in Colombia by 81 percent of poll respondents. To achieve victory, the campaign has reaffirmed the values and ethics of a professional military throughout a force that has been fighting an enemy within its own borders for decades. The campaign sets the foundation for good citizenship and a military that Colombian citizens can count on to conduct itself in accordance with the highest ethical and moral standards. “The vision is to carry out the duties that the State requires of us, which has a direct impact on our defense of our sovereignty, of our independence, the integrity of our national territory and the constitutional order,” Gen. Mantilla said. “We can carry out all of that with the commitment and the courage of all the men and women that comprise the force, with their total devotion to duty, courage, discipline, modernization, training and values, the highest morale and ‘Faith in the Cause.’ ” The Colombian Army has been fighting an insurgency led by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) for more than 50 years. During the past five years, the Army and the Colombian Government have mounted a series of successful operations against the FARC and have begun to plan for the end of the conflict. Key to recent successes is the professionalism and dedication of the Colombian Army and its willingness to strive for constant improvement not only of the institution but of its members. More than 50 years of combat causes an army to adapt and change, and allows for the chance to review tactics and strategy, and try new ideas. In Colombia, the Army saw a need to develop a program that reaffirms and strengthens the fundamental principles of ethics and values that provide the foundation for its Soldiers to perform their mission. The initiative, called “Fe en la Causa” (Faith in the Cause), was developed by General Alejandro Navas during his time as commander of the Colombian Army and began in December 2010. The program not only involves the officers, NCOs [noncommissioned officers], and Soldiers of the Army, but also seeks to involve the Colombian civilian population by reinforcing the ethical component of combat operations that will help lead the Military and the nation to victory against the FARC. With Gen. Navas’ appointment as commander of the military forces, “Fe en la Causa” has also been embraced by all services. center_img There’s no worse disease than hate, no greater gift than health, no other faith like trust, and no other joy like peace. I thank the creator and nature for the growth arising from the path of peace and harmony in my beautiful Colombia. In my view this is a very good article, very well written. But it would be good to put in the exact day the campaign was created because all that is there is the month and the year XDDD These are the officers who make us proud to be Colombians. Congratulations to Colonel Wilson Torres Pradolast_img read more

Regional Cyber Leaders Share Common Challenges in Cyber Security and Defense

first_imgFrom April 14-16, the workshop provided a forum for dialog among military professionals on information technology, information sharing, and cybersecurity best practices, according to information from SOUTHCOM’s Cyber Defense Division and Joint Cyber Center, the event’s organizers. Panel discussions and group presentations allowed the participants to work collaboratively in combining their experiences and lessons learned in the cyber arena with the general audience. Each group was given different categories of security and/or cyber threat examples for which they were tasked to come up with the type of activities that these entail, the actors who perpetrate them, their objectives, and the motivation behind them, whether it be political, social or one from which there is potential economic gain. Mexican Navy Commander Jorge Daniel Berdon Lara, who works with Information Security at SEMAR, explained that having this sort of information sharing exchange with regional counterparts is beneficial. “This workshop has given us the opportunity to build contacts to initiate joint cooperation links with our regional counterparts in the field,” he stated. “This event opens doors and facilitates the exchange of information in this respect. We got different perspectives and a strategic vision on the cyber threats common to us all, especially in Latin America.” A significant aspect of the three-day dialogue was Trinidad and Tobago’s presentation on their efforts in advancing national development on cyber security. Through their Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC) for Cyber Security, they are the first Caribbean country to have published a national cyber security strategy in 2012. For Brazilian Army Colonel Alan Denilson Lima Costa, Deputy Chief of the Army’s Cyber Defense Center (CD Ciber), which is undertaking a monumental cyber and information security challenge ahead of Brazil’s upcoming role as host of the Summer Olympic Games in 2016, this type of initiative [bringing together partner nation cyber personnel] facilitates open discussions on cyber threats and the tactical aspects surrounding it. Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force Major Fareed Ian Mohammed, from the Communications Systems Dominance Directorate, talked about the IMC’s developments for this effort and of the importance of securing their cyber environments given that the energy sector is the country’s primary income earner, accounting for 40 percent of the country’s gross domestic product. But other examples of security breaches involved information theft by actors including a range of users, from disgruntled employees, nation states with a particular interest, and hackers to organized crime groups looking to extract personal information through social engineering for economic gain, the need to gain access to technology, or simply sowing fear and chaos. As one of the group’s representatives, Col. Alan pointed out that “the objectives behind the frequent hacker activity perceived in Brazil were of a social nature, as a form of protest to cause political destabilization and to discredit the government.” A significant aspect of the three-day dialogue was Trinidad and Tobago’s presentation on their efforts in advancing national development on cyber security. Through their Inter-Ministerial Committee (IMC) for Cyber Security, they are the first Caribbean country to have published a national cyber security strategy in 2012. Among other topics, Colombian Navy Commander José William Hernández Murillo, Chief of Operations of CCOC, briefed on the interagency commission’s composition. The three agencies “provide technical assistance in coordinating incident management, developing operational capabilities, providing cyber intelligence information, and support and guidance related to cyber defense in order to collectively and actively collaborate on incident resolution,” he said. The conclusion that was reached, however, was that as technology advances, so does the room for threats, so countries, governments, the private industry, and academia have to remain in close touch in order to address concerns jointly, collaboratively, and with the openness to share the knowledge and the lessons learned from each individual experience. On this occasion, U.S. Northern Command also attended with a delegation from Mexico’s Secretariat of National Defense (SEDENA) and Secretariat of the Navy (SEMAR). In a country with 46 million cybernauts – 43.5 percent of Mexico’s population – their efforts to advance their current cyber security initiatives is paramount, and the representatives were keen on listening to the other countries’ efforts in that respect. Among other topics, Colombian Navy Commander José William Hernández Murillo, Chief of Operations of CCOC, briefed on the interagency commission’s composition. The three agencies “provide technical assistance in coordinating incident management, developing operational capabilities, providing cyber intelligence information, and support and guidance related to cyber defense in order to collectively and actively collaborate on incident resolution,” he said. By Dialogo April 22, 2015 “We have grown and expanded [the country’s cyber strategy and structure] by building our capabilities in the cyber arena through agreements, trainings, certifications, and increasing the number of trained professional specialists in cyber security,” Cmdr. Hernández told Diálogo. For three days, Armed Forces, Public Security, private industry, and academic information technology and cybersecurity professionals from 18 partner nations in the Americas came together in a United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM)-sponsored workshop on Command, Control, Communications, Computer Systems (PNC4S), and Cyber Security. Command and control systems were also a relevant topic of discussion since all the participating countries deal are facing this challenge as they develop their national cyber security policies and frameworks. Though there may not have been an answer to the common worries in this respect, it was clear to all present that a cyber threat against command and control systems implies a potential threat to the national security of any country, regardless of size, economic standing, or strength. “It’s an excellent initiative for all of us here, but there is still a void in terms of military defense operations in the cyber realm,” he explained. Col. Alan suggested that a practical exercise specifically for cyber defense operations would be a great next step. “Even though Brazil undertakes planning efforts for cyber defense, there needs to be more in terms of doctrine and joint planning efforts,” he said. Colombia, which has made great strides in developing their national cyber strategy in the last few years, briefed participants on their interagency approach and the responsibilities and areas covered by each of the cyber agencies involved. These include the national-level Joint Cyber Command (CCOC), the cyber defense units of each of the three Military branches, the national Police Cyber Center (CCP), and the colCERT – the country’s cyber emergency response center, which consists of a national-level team responsible for coordinating aspects related to information security. With respect to the workshop itself, Maj. Mohammed said everything in the cyber realm is new for them, a nation that is developing their national strategy in this respect, but is not immune to hackers and cyber security threats. “It’s important to collaborate with our partners in developing this new domain; there is no room for our old, our traditional ways of thinking to address a new domain like cyber,” he explained. “It’s very important to create partnerships to collaborate jointly.” For three days, Armed Forces, Public Security, private industry, and academic information technology and cybersecurity professionals from 18 partner nations in the Americas came together in a United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM)-sponsored workshop on Command, Control, Communications, Computer Systems (PNC4S), and Cyber Security. “It’s an excellent initiative for all of us here, but there is still a void in terms of military defense operations in the cyber realm,” he explained. Col. Alan suggested that a practical exercise specifically for cyber defense operations would be a great next step. “Even though Brazil undertakes planning efforts for cyber defense, there needs to be more in terms of doctrine and joint planning efforts,” he said. But other examples of security breaches involved information theft by actors including a range of users, from disgruntled employees, nation states with a particular interest, and hackers to organized crime groups looking to extract personal information through social engineering for economic gain, the need to gain access to technology, or simply sowing fear and chaos. “The primary purpose was to bring a variety of perspectives together, develop capabilities, and strengthen regional cooperation and interoperability in the cyber arena,” said the organizers. “And the ultimate goal was to open doors for future collaboration to aid in confronting our common regional security challenges.” Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force Major Fareed Ian Mohammed, from the Communications Systems Dominance Directorate, talked about the IMC’s developments for this effort and of the importance of securing their cyber environments given that the energy sector is the country’s primary income earner, accounting for 40 percent of the country’s gross domestic product. “Cyber defense often fails if it’s based on concepts from last century’s battles.” That phrase, from the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command’s presentation, set the tone for a candid conversation on the efforts that are being undertaken and must be further developed to address the challenges posed by cyber security threats today. For Brazilian Army Colonel Alan Denilson Lima Costa, Deputy Chief of the Army’s Cyber Defense Center (CD Ciber), which is undertaking a monumental cyber and information security challenge ahead of Brazil’s upcoming role as host of the Summer Olympic Games in 2016, this type of initiative [bringing together partner nation cyber personnel] facilitates open discussions on cyber threats and the tactical aspects surrounding it. Colombia, which has made great strides in developing their national cyber strategy in the last few years, briefed participants on their interagency approach and the responsibilities and areas covered by each of the cyber agencies involved. These include the national-level Joint Cyber Command (CCOC), the cyber defense units of each of the three Military branches, the national Police Cyber Center (CCP), and the colCERT – the country’s cyber emergency response center, which consists of a national-level team responsible for coordinating aspects related to information security. As one of the group’s representatives, Col. Alan pointed out that “the objectives behind the frequent hacker activity perceived in Brazil were of a social nature, as a form of protest to cause political destabilization and to discredit the government.” “In addition to developing the national strategy by 2012, from 2013 to 2014, the IMC also developed a National Cybercrime Policy, the country’s Cybersecurity Agency, a Computer Security Incident Response Team, and a national Cyber Security Bill [although it has since lapsed],” he explained. “In addition to developing the national strategy by 2012, from 2013 to 2014, the IMC also developed a National Cybercrime Policy, the country’s Cybersecurity Agency, a Computer Security Incident Response Team, and a national Cyber Security Bill [although it has since lapsed],” he explained. With respect to the workshop itself, Maj. Mohammed said everything in the cyber realm is new for them, a nation that is developing their national strategy in this respect, but is not immune to hackers and cyber security threats. “It’s important to collaborate with our partners in developing this new domain; there is no room for our old, our traditional ways of thinking to address a new domain like cyber,” he explained. “It’s very important to create partnerships to collaborate jointly.” “We have grown and expanded [the country’s cyber strategy and structure] by building our capabilities in the cyber arena through agreements, trainings, certifications, and increasing the number of trained professional specialists in cyber security,” Cmdr. Hernández told Diálogo. On this occasion, U.S. Northern Command also attended with a delegation from Mexico’s Secretariat of National Defense (SEDENA) and Secretariat of the Navy (SEMAR). In a country with 46 million cybernauts – 43.5 percent of Mexico’s population – their efforts to advance their current cyber security initiatives is paramount, and the representatives were keen on listening to the other countries’ efforts in that respect. “Cyber defense often fails if it’s based on concepts from last century’s battles.” That phrase, from the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command’s presentation, set the tone for a candid conversation on the efforts that are being undertaken and must be further developed to address the challenges posed by cyber security threats today. Mexican Navy Commander Jorge Daniel Berdon Lara, who works with Information Security at SEMAR, explained that having this sort of information sharing exchange with regional counterparts is beneficial. “This workshop has given us the opportunity to build contacts to initiate joint cooperation links with our regional counterparts in the field,” he stated. “This event opens doors and facilitates the exchange of information in this respect. We got different perspectives and a strategic vision on the cyber threats common to us all, especially in Latin America.” Panel discussions and group presentations allowed the participants to work collaboratively in combining their experiences and lessons learned in the cyber arena with the general audience. Each group was given different categories of security and/or cyber threat examples for which they were tasked to come up with the type of activities that these entail, the actors who perpetrate them, their objectives, and the motivation behind them, whether it be political, social or one from which there is potential economic gain. “The primary purpose was to bring a variety of perspectives together, develop capabilities, and strengthen regional cooperation and interoperability in the cyber arena,” said the organizers. “And the ultimate goal was to open doors for future collaboration to aid in confronting our common regional security challenges.” From April 14-16, the workshop provided a forum for dialog among military professionals on information technology, information sharing, and cybersecurity best practices, according to information from SOUTHCOM’s Cyber Defense Division and Joint Cyber Center, the event’s organizers. Command and control systems were also a relevant topic of discussion since all the participating countries deal are facing this challenge as they develop their national cyber security policies and frameworks. Though there may not have been an answer to the common worries in this respect, it was clear to all present that a cyber threat against command and control systems implies a potential threat to the national security of any country, regardless of size, economic standing, or strength. The conclusion that was reached, however, was that as technology advances, so does the room for threats, so countries, governments, the private industry, and academia have to remain in close touch in order to address concerns jointly, collaboratively, and with the openness to share the knowledge and the lessons learned from each individual experience.last_img read more

Technological Initiatives Help Brazilian Armed Forces Reduce Deforestation

first_imgBy Dialogo October 16, 2015 Brilliant move! That is what we and nature both want, commendable actions to ensure the balance between animals and people! We depend on perfect harmony with nature! Congratulations on this beautiful and beneficial response for preservation. Ecological disasters are the consequence of inhuman and unbridled ambition by people with no conscience or respect for themselves, let alone others! Nature is paying back humanity for the mistreatment that it has endured for so long! We have to raise awareness that our planet is a living being that is being destroyed! Let’s change while we still have the chance to reverse the harm done! We have to plant fruit trees and other trees needed for development, stability, and equilibrium for mankind! It is for the common good of all! The natives can teach us more about civility than any university scholar! Therefore, let’s follow their example on preserving nature, instead of disrespecting them and doing almost nothing for them! They are native beings who deserve to be followed and respected! Just give them the duty of monitoring the Amazon Forest, and I guarantee that before long, they will bring back balance to the Brazilian forest and fauna! All that we need to do is give the responsibility to the thousands of indigenous villages in the Amazon to bring everything back to harmony, and all beings in the world will be thankful! They deserve this important role. After all, it was they who were the guardians of Brazilian land! It is the least we can do to honour them! Deforestation has decreased, but the situation is still dire. If they are stripped away and not replaced, even if only a few, there won’t be anymore one day.Deforestation must stop. Very interesting Under the Action Plan, the collaborative approach is responsible for repressing criminal activities, such as illegal logging, in the Brazilian Amazon. A joint effort To help preserve the region’s natural resources, authorities have launched two new projects: Amazônia SAR (which refers to the English acronym for Synthetic Aperture Radar), which helps the Armed Forces monitor activities in the Legal Amazon Region, and Amazônia Conectada (Connected Amazon), which brings Internet access to the Amazon. The technological advancements provided by these initiatives will help the Armed Forces and other authorities monitor environmental problems like deforestation, which has decreased 82% over the past decade according to the National Institute for Space Research (INPE). Meanwhile, the Deforestation Monitoring Project in the Legal Amazon Region (PRODES), which maps images from Earth observation satellite Landsat 8, revealed the annual rate of deforestation in the region fell from 27,772 square kilometers to 5,012 square kilometers between 2004-2014. “These [scientific and technological] instruments conduct detailed monitoring of the region, collecting information in a more agile manner and distributing this information to the supervisory agencies,” said Minister of Science, Technology, and Innovation Aldo Rebelo said when the figures were released on August 14. That effort is aided by the Amazônia SAR project’s orbital radar, which monitors the 950,000 square kilometers of the Legal Amazon Region; it allows security forces to deploy to areas where environmental threats, such as illegal logging operations, are occurring. Optical imaging radars monitor just 280,000 square kilometers every 15 days when there are no clouds in the sky, but the new system can operate in adverse weather; with a total cost of R$80.5 million (21.38 million dollars), it’s being coordinated by the Operations and Management Center of the Amazon Protection System (CENSIPAM), an agency operating under the Ministry of Defense that partnered with IBAMA and INPE. “We expect to have a greater capacity to generate information and support enforcement actions against illegal logging and associated environmental crimes,” Francisco José Barbosa de Oliveira Filho, director of the Department of Policies to Combat Deforestation (CPPD), said. Protecting the Amazon region While the Amazônia SAR project helps the Armed Forces stay abreast of potential illegal activities in the Legal Amazon Region, the Amazônia Conectada initiative improves the Military’s communications by providing better infrastructure. Improved infrastructure for the Military While the technological tools provided by Amazônia SAR and Amazônia Conectada initiatives are new, the country’s efforts to protect the Legal Amazon Region are not. “The new technology allows us to observe the forest through the clouds,” Rogério Guedes, CENSIPAM’s director general, said at the project’s launch on July 20. “The monitored area comprises the Arc of Deforestation [500,000 square kilometers that account for the highest rates of deforestation in the Amazon] and is seven times the size of Amapá state.” To promote the sustainable development of Brazil’s environment, authorities in the 1950s created the Legal Amazon Region, which encompasses nine Brazilian states: Acre, Amapá, Amazonas, Maranhão, Mato Grosso, Pará, Rondônia, Roraima, and Tocantins. The fight against deforestation of the Amazon forest in this region, which comprises about 60% of Brazil’s territory, is a joint effort between the Armed Forces, the Federal Police, and the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA), a federal agency under the Ministry of Environment with the authority to enforce environmental law. Brazil’s Armed Forces, Federal Police, and other government agencies are working together to protect the country’s valuable natural resources under the Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Deforestation in the Legal Amazon Region (PPCDAm, for its Portuguese acronym). In July, the Ministry of Science, Technology, and Innovation launched the project, which brings high-speed Internet to 52 municipalities in the rainforest and benefits 3.8 million people. The goal of the program, which is being carried out by the Army, is to install a fiber optic network in the Amazon Basin’s river beds; the first stretch of underwater cable became operational on July 16, and workers are toiling to implement the second one. Separating legal and illegal deforestation is a big challenge for authorities. “This differentiation will depend on a greater integration of information from the state and federal governments, as well as engagement with the private sector and Brazilian and international companies regarding the demand for products linked to deforestation.” In 1995, an INPE study found that a one-year record of 29,059 square kilometers had been deforested. In 2004, the federal government launched the PPCDAm, which created protected areas and strengthened the monitoring of illegal logging with the support of the Armed Forces. The federal government’s goal is to eliminate illegal deforestation by 2030. Currently in the implementation phase, the orbital radar will monitor the region during the cloudy season (October to April), generating alerts for enforcement actions against deforestation and sending the information to the INPE for the Real Time Deforestation Detection System (DETER) to process. The degradation of the Amazon intensifies during the cloudy season, according to the Ministry of Defense. Through the Amazônia Conectada program, a total of 7,800 kilometers will be covered, including the rainforest’s most remote areas. That’s a significant improvement from the fiber optic network that only covered the city of Manaus before the project’s inception. Consequently, the program improves the infrastructure for military communications along the border and strengthens IBAMA’s communications in the Amazon region. “The PPCDAm has a list of 112 causes that lead to deforestation, illustrating the complexity of the issue,” Oliveira Filho said. “The PPCDAm wound up being officially included as an instrument of the National Policy on Climate Change (NPCC), which was established in 2009 and is the main legal framework on climate change in the country.” “To understand the complexity of managing this natural heritage, we must remember that this is not an isolated area, but a region of approximately 5 million square kilometers, which spans nine states and is home to more than 25 million people, including more than 300,000 indigenous persons and many traditional communities.”last_img read more

Legal Roundup

first_img August 15, 2005 Regular News Legal Roundup Legal Roundup: Milton Named Chair: Jacksonville’s Joseph P. Milton has been elected chair of the Florida Supreme Court Nominating Commission and Tina Matte of Ft. Myers was elected vice-chair. Other members of the Florida Supreme Court Nominating Commission include Arturo Alvarez, Andrew Grigsby, Olga Calvet, Dean Colson, Cynthia Tunnicliff, Basil Bain, and Diana Santa Maria. Miami Firm Gives to UM: Abadin Jaramillo Cook & Heffernan in South Miami was recently honored by the University of Miami Society of University Founders for their $50,000 donation to the school. Partners Ramon Abadin, Julio Jaramillo, and Kimberly Cook accepted a bronze medallion in recognition for the firm’s commitment to the school. Sopp Named Nassau Bar President: Teresa J. “Ten” Sopp of Yulee has been elected president of the Nassau County Bar Association. Sopp is a board-certified criminal trial lawyer. Jeffrey Tomassetti of Fernandina Beach has been elected vice-president; Jan Carver of Fernandina Beach has been elected treasurer, and Pratt O’Connor of Fernandina Beach has been elected secretary. The association meets at noon on the third Tuesday of each month at the historic Palace Saloon in Fernandina Beach. Pro Bono Evening a Jazzy Event: The Legal Aid Society of Palm Beach County, together with the Sun Sentinel/WB39 Children’s Fund hosted the 17th Annual Pro Bono Recognition Evening. The theme of the evening was “New Orleans and All that Jazz” and over 700 individuals attended the event which netted over $190,000. All funds generated by the evening will benefit the disadvantaged children, families, and elders served by Legal Aid and the children served by the Sun Sentinel/WB39 Children’s Fund. Honored at the event were the following Palm Beach County attorneys: Joyce Conway (Family Law Award); Joel H. Feldman (Consumer Law Award); Todd M. Feldman (Consumer Law Award); L. Martin Flanagan (Emeritus Award); Rand Hoch (Community Service Award); Hank Jackson (Appellate Law Award); Christopher Jette (Criminal Law Award); M. Daniel Logan (Construction Law Award); William Manikas (Real Property Award); Kathryn L. McHale (Elder Law Award); Steven D. Rubin (Justice for All Award); and the Fourth DCA Staff Attorneys (Special Services Award). MADD Receives Grant from Ricci~Leopold: Ricci~Leopold recently made a grant to Mothers Against Drunk Driving to sponsor the MADD and Sports Car Club of America “Get In Gear Road Rally,” which was held in Palm Beach County in July. The road rally was designed to offer people a family-friendly event that joins teams of car and road enthusiasts to have fun, celebrate life, and to bring the community together. “As a firm dedicated to consumer safety, truth, and justice we are happy to assist MADD in making this event a resounding success,” said partner Ted Leopold. “MADD provides educational, safety, and consumer awareness programs in our community and around the nation.” Land Loss Prevention Project: Legal Services of Greater Miami has received a grant from the ABA to start a Land Loss Prevention Project in partnership with the South Miami-Kendall Bar Association to address the problem of low-income African Americans losing title to their real property due to intestate succession when people die without wills. All services are free, and will be provided by LSGMI staff and by volunteer attorneys recruited by the South Miami-Kendall Bar Association . “This project will ensure that the hard earned assets of low-income seniors remain intact, and pass to the beneficiaries of their choice so that they can accumulate wealth,” said Lashan Fagan, the lead LSGMI attorney on the Project.last_img read more

The entire program of the Communication Day in Rovinj was presented

first_imgThe importance of communication and marketing in the tourism sector nowadays should not be emphasized enough, and the right place to educate and learn about new trends in the world of communication are the Days of Communications in Rovinj.Communication days will be held from April 12-15 in Rovinj. For three days, the program will be held in parallel in three halls. In addition to the 16 top speakers who will perform in the main hall, participants will be able to hear other content, including presentations by the finalists of the Effie competition that celebrates the effectiveness of campaigns, as well as the finalists of the Young Lions Croatia competition for young hopes. Good practices and discussions in which all festival visitors can participate like PPP, Beers after the program, continue this year as well, but they are reinforced by a new format – debate. The organizers have discovered another intriguing lecturer, and he is coming to the advertising festival no less and no more than AdBlock. Laura Sophie Dornheim, Head of Communications at eyeo, whose products are AdBlock Plus, AdBlock Browser and Flattr, will speak on behalf of the AdBlock system, whose primary purpose is to block ads. The speakers that have been announced in recent months, and which we will listen to in the main hall are:  Jayanta Jenkins, global creative director of Twitter, Brad Parscale, campaign director Donald J. Trump, Susan Credle, one of the most powerful women in the marketing industry, Mr. Bingo top illustrator, architect of controversial projects, Graham Fink one of the most awarded creative directors in the world and a multimedia artist who “draws the eye”, experts who use technology in the service of brand communication: Steve Lok, Oliver Kibblewhite i Christoffer Malmer, award-winning public relations professionals Gabriela Lungu i Hermes Holm, Laura Sophie Dornheim and from AdBlock, Cody Foster from Viacom, Alemsah Ozturk Chief Happiness Officer Agency 4129Grey, James Kirkham, a digital media commentator and six years in a row lecturer at the Cannes Lions Festival and others.March 20.03.2018, 12, Zagreb – Presentation of the Communications Day program, which will be held in Rovinj from April 15-XNUMX. Davor Bruketa, Dunja Ivana Ballon, Jani Jilek participated in the presentation.Photo: Igor Soban / PIXSELLOn the occasion of the presentation of the program, the President of the Management Board of HURA Davor Bruketa emphasized: “The Days of Communication festival is a place where current world practices from the communication industry are presented. Certainly, we bring lecturers who talk about global best practices, but also allow visitors to discuss with individuals whose way of working we question, but we cannot ignore the fact how much this work affects the direction of industry development and its perception in the eyes of the general public.”With the representative of AdBlock, the arrival has been announced Kodija Foster, Vice President of Data Strategy at the Sixth Largest Media Conglomerate in the World – Viacom. Viacom employs almost ten thousand people, and owns the production company Paramount Pictures (Titanic, Iron Man and Forrest Gump, etc.) and popular channels such as MTV and Comedy Central. Kodi is engaged in synthesizing Viacom’s data and translating it into content and integrated marketing communication, which he will talk about at the Communication Days.Director of the Day of Communications and director of the festival program, Dunja Ivana Ballon added: “This year we are bringing in big names and pushing boundaries. At the Days of Communications, the campaign manager for the American president, the global creative director of one of the leading social networks – Twitter, and a representative of a company that deals with blocking ads, and at the same time promotes the so-called Acceptable Ads initiative. The participants of the festival can expect interactive content, and we are introducing a new format of debate, in which we will continue to ask questions and open a discussion. The fact that we have long since exceeded the total number of last year’s participants speaks volumes about the quality of the overall program and the praise of previous participants.”Along with a selection of top lectures, the best advertisers and the best agencies in Croatia will be announced at the Communications Days as part of national professional competitions – Effie for efficiency, IdeaX for creativity, Mixx for digital and Yyoung Lions Croatia for young talents in industry.For more information on Communication Days, visit the official website of the festival www.danikomunikacija.comlast_img read more

Saudi to enforce round-the-clock virus curfew at Eid

first_imgSaudi Arabia will enforce a round-the-clock nationwide curfew during the five-day Eid al-Fitr holiday later this month to fight the coronavirus, the interior ministry said Tuesday, as infections spike.The kingdom, which has reported the highest number of virus cases in the Gulf region, is scrambling to limit the spread of the deadly disease.A full lockdown will be reimposed around the country from May 23-27, the ministry said in a statement released by the official Saudi Press Agency. The period coincides with the Muslim festival that marks the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. Topics : Most parts of the kingdom were put under full lockdown following the outbreak, but last month the government relaxed the curfew between the hours of 9am and 5pm.Malls and retailers have been allowed to reopen, except in major hotspots including the holy city of Mecca — where confirmed cases have soared, despite a stringent lockdown.The health ministry said Tuesday the number of COVID-19 deaths had risen to 264 and confirmed infections to 42,925, while 15,257 people have recovered.In March, Saudi Arabia suspended the year-round “umrah” pilgrimage over fears of the disease spreading in Islam’s holiest cities.center_img Authorities are yet to announce whether they will proceed with this year’s hajj — scheduled for late July — but they have urged Muslims to temporarily defer preparations for the annual pilgrimage.Last year, some 2.5 million faithful travelled to Saudi Arabia from across the world to participate in the hajj, which Muslims are obliged to perform at least once during their lifetime.The Arab world’s biggest economy has also closed cinemas and restaurants and halted flights as it attempts to contain the virus.King Salman has warned of a “more difficult” fight ahead against COVID-19, as the kingdom faces the double blow of virus-led shutdowns and crashing oil prices.last_img read more