ASTON VILLA VS LEICESTER CITY

first_imgVILLA (4-1-4-1)GUZAN, HUTTON, OKORE, LESCOTT, BACUNA, SANCHEZ,WESTWOOD, VERETOUT, GANA, SINCLAIR, AYEWLEICESTER (4-4-2)VARDY, OKAZAKI,MAHREZ, KING, KANTE, ALBRIGHTON,DE LAET, FUCHS, MORGAN, SIMPSON,SCHMEICHELLeicester City are now level at the top of the Barclays Premier League with Arsenal after beating Spurs 1-0 at White Hart Lane on Wednesday thanks to Robert Huth’s late winner at White Hart Lane.It ended their run of three games without a league win, while Huth’s goal was Leicester’s first in 374 minutes.On Tuesday, Aston Villa claimed their first win in the Barclays Premier League in 157 days when they beat Crystal Palace 1-0 thanks to a goal from central defender Joleon Lescott.It was also Villa’s first Premier League win in 20 attempts, having lost 14 of the previous 19.They remain at the foot of the table and face high-riding Leicester City next.The most common Premier League result between these teams at Villa Park is a draw. In nine clashes, four have been drawn while Villa have won three and Leicester two.When they met at the King Power Stadium in September it was a remarkable game. Villa led 2-0 but Leicester struck three times in the final 18 minutes, with Nathan Dyer stealing an 89th-minute winner.last_img read more

West indies cricket comatose

first_img Better in past days The marauding dominance of the West Indies team in those glory days was hardly due to any stroke of genius or brilliant structures and systems implemented by the board then, compared to what is happening now. In fact, I would venture to say that things are better today for the average regional cricketer than they were back in those glory days. Other social, cultural and cricket dynamics have significantly shifted over the past two decades and have effectively forced West Indies cricket into relative obscurity. Those are not restricted to the ineptitude of successive boards and administrators. I have long argued that the problems of West Indies cricket are complex and multifaceted and at this point I would like to add unsolvable. West Indies cricket will never return to what it used to be. The game of cricket has evolved globally, but it has done so at an even faster rate in the West Indies. The fundamental factor driving the current reality is the shift in the mindset and focus of the young and emerging players in the region. The advent of the fast, frantic and cash-rich T20 version of the game has rendered the longer versions of the game irrelevant and unattractive to the average young cricketer across the region. This is quite understandable, since the players stand to make ton loads more money and become bigger and more celebrated stars if they become swashbuckling T20 experts such as Chris Gayle, Kieron Pollard, and Andre Russell, instead of seeking to represent a struggling mockery of a Test team that is merely clinging to the remnants of a triumphant past. The future of West Indies cricket lies in the T20 format and nowhere else. The West Indies are just as pathetic and shameless in 50-over cricket as they are in Test cricket. The natural athleticism, speed, strength, agility plus typically short attention span makes the Caribbean cricketer the perfect fit for T20. Only the blind optimists will remain defiant and continue to clutch at the rhetoric-laced emotional straws being offered as a chance of a full West Indies revival. The hard, cold fact of the matter is that West Indies cricket remains in a serious coma gasping for its last breath, with the life support machine being fuelled by the much-maligned Twenty20 cricket. ONE of my colleagues said in a commentary last week that the West Indies Cricket Board is sleeping. Upon hearing that pronouncement, I contacted him immediately, telling him it was worse. It is not just that the board is sleeping; West Indies cricket itself is in a coma. This conversation took place even before the regional team bowed and slumped to another predictable and pathetic innings defeat in the first Test match on the current tour of Sri Lanka. Blaming a sleeping WICB for the continuous deterioration of our cricket is an easy way out, within which lies a covert denial of the actual gravity of the situation. Many Caribbean fans continue to profess unconditional support for the West Indies team. Again, an attitude buried in a deep-seated denial of the rapid whittling away of the West Indies team and the very institution of West Indies cricket as we once knew it. The many clichÈd rants about returning to the glory days and turning the corner are basically ‘pie in the sky’ dreams based on emotionalism, blind loyalty, and patriotism without any semblance of appreciation for the reality. While the administrators of the regional board provide an easy punching bag for the state of our cricket, my retort to that is that the competence of our administrators is in no way significantly worse today than it was in the 1970s, 80s and 90s.last_img read more

AAAS President Rails Against ID

first_imgAlan Leshner, CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and executive publisher of Science, wrote an editorial asking “Why are scientists so upset about the growing movement to bring ‘intelligent design’ (ID) into science classrooms and public education venues such as science museums, zoos, and theme parks?”  He took the occasion of the 80th anniversary of the Scopes trial to arouse readers of the journal to oppose the movement.1The problem is that ID advocates attempt to dress up religious beliefs to make them look like science.  By redefining what is and isn’t science, they also put the public—particularly young people—at risk of being inadequately prepared to live in modern society.  Twenty-first-century citizens are regularly required to make decisions about issues that have heavy science- and technology-related content, such as medical care, personal security, shopping choices, and what their children should be taught in school.  To make those choices wisely, they will need to distinguish science-based evidence from pseudoscientific claims.    There is an important distinction between a belief and a theory.  ID is cast by its proponents as a scientific theory, an alternative to evolution, but it fails the criteria for achieving that status.  In our business, a theory is not an educated guess nor, emphatically, is it a belief.  Scientific theories attempt to explain what can be observed, and it is essential that they be testable by repeatable observations and experimentation.  In fact, “belief” is a word you almost never hear in science.  We do not believe theories.  We accept or reject them based on their ability to explain natural phenomena, and they must be testable with scientific methodologies. (Emphasis added in all quotes.)He repeats several talking points of the anti-ID position: (1) evolution is just as much a theory as gravity, (2) evolutionary does not attempt to answer the religious questions of whether God was behind evolution, “because it is a matter of belief that is outside our realm,” and (3) ID can rightfully be taught in humanities or philosophy courses but not in the science class; “Redefining science to get a particular belief into the classroom simply isn’t educationally sound,” he says.Just as the scientific community has broad responsibilities to monitor the integrity with which its members conduct their work, it also must take some responsibility for the uses of science and for how it is portrayed to the public.  That requires us to be clear about what science is and to distinguish clearly between scientific and belief systems, in schools and in various public venues devoted to science.  Otherwise, we will fail in our obligation to our fellow citizens and to the successor generations of students who will depend on science for their future.1Alan Leshner, “Redefining Science,” Science, Vol 309, Issue 5732, 221, 8 July 2005, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1116621].So he is a naive positivist.  Sad.  That the president of the AAAS would have so little understanding of history and philosophy of science is pathetic.  He doesn’t even realize that he just disqualified Darwinism by his own criteria of science.  Clearly evolutionary theory involves heavy doses of belief, while ID entails sound scientific practices similar to those used in cryptography and archaeology.  Evolution is neither testable nor repeatable, yet is maintained with such tenacity that any observation, no matter how contrary, becomes retroactively forced into the belief system.  And who is Leshner to teach about wisdom, responsibility and integrity?  Did those moral qualities evolve, too?  If so, they are without foundation; if not, he has conceded the existence of moral absolutes, and by extension, a moral Lawgiver.    All his propaganda tactics and fallacies are explained in the Baloney Detector (see especially either-or fallacy, association, equivocation and bluffing).  Leshner should become a political speechwriter where his skills would be more appropriate.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

The return of the RBC Taylor Prize Emerging Writers Mentorship Program

first_imgNadina Taylor, a trustee of the Charles Taylor Foundation and daughter of the late Charles Taylor, is a strong champion of the program. “We’ve seen what a huge impact the RBC Taylor Prize Emerging Writer Award can have on a writer’s career and wanted to amplify that effect with this opportunity – to help prepare these talented writers for the complex and competitive world of writing and publishing.”“At RBC Wealth Management, we believe it is important to identify, nurture and support the next generation of Canadian talent and to provide writers in the early stages of their career with mentorship opportunities that will help them succeed in the professional world,” said Vijay Parmar, President of RBC PH&N Investment Counsel.Helen Knott of Fort St. John is one of the five “emergent” writers who have an existing body of work, and a non-fiction manuscript close to completion. The participants will correspond with their mentors prior to travelling to Toronto for the Prize weekend, Feb 28 through March 4th. When the participants meet with their mentors, they will participate in an intensive day of professional development, accompany their mentors through media and events, and participate in the Awards Luncheon on Monday, March 4th.Helen Knott — University of Northern British Columbia Knott is of Dane Zaa, Nehiyaw, and mixed Euro descent from Prophet River First Nations, living in Fort St. John, BC. She has published short stories and poetry in the Malahat Review, Red Rising Magazine, through CBC Arts, the Surviving Canada Anthology, alongside other publications and poetry video productions. In 2017, Helen was a recipient of the REVEAL Indigenous Art Award. In 2016, she was one of sixteen women featured globally by the Nobel Women’s Initiative for her commitment to ending gender-based violence and activism. Her first book, In My Own Moccasins: A Memoir of Struggle and Resilience, will be released in August 2019. She is currently writing an Indigenous female manifesto entitled, Taking Back the Bones, where a personal narrative is interwoven with humour, academic research and critical reflection.The RBC Taylor Prize was established in 1998 by the trustees of the Charles Taylor Foundation and first awarded in 2000, 2018 marks the seventeenth year of awarding the RBC Taylor Prize, which commemorates Charles Taylor’s pursuit of excellence in the field of literary non-fiction. The Prize is awarded to the author whose book best combines a superb command of the English language, an elegance of style, and a subtlety of thought and perception. All finalists receive $5,000, and the winner receives a further $25,000. All authors are presented with a custom leather-bound version of their shortlisted book at the award ceremony. All finalists receive promotional support for their nominated titles.The four other participants of the 2019 RBC Taylor Prize Emerging Writers Mentorship Program are; TORONTO, ONT – The RBC Taylor Prize and the RBC Foundation announced the return of this professional development program, that is aimed to support the next generation of Canadian writers.The program pairs five emerging writers, selected from the nation’s writing programs, with the finalists for the 2019 RBC Taylor Prize. The award honours and celebrates the pursuit of excellence in literary non-fiction.The program is curated by Joe Kertes, Dean Emeritus of the Humber College School of Creative Arts & Performance in Toronto. The trustees of the Charles Taylor Foundation are; Vijay Parmar, David Staines, Edward Taylor, Nadina Taylor, and Noreen Taylor. The Prize Manager is Sheila Kay.center_img Becky Blake — University of Guelph Blake won the CBC Nonfiction Prize in 2017 and the CBC Short Story Prize in 2013. She is a graduate of the Creative Writing MFA Program at the University of Guelph, and her work has appeared in journals, magazines, and newspapers across Canada. Her debut novel, Proof I Was Here, is forthcoming from Wolsak & Wynn’s Buckrider Books in May 2019. She currently lives in Toronto where she is working on a memoir-in-essays called Everything I’m About to Say Is a Lie. The title refers to the recommended way to answer a phone that’s been tapped (as Blake’s once was). Her memoir draws on this and other experiences ranging from the criminal to the comical as she examines the singular power of a true story and the license we sometimes take to tell one.Kirk Angus Johnson — University of King’s College / Dalhousie Johnson is of both Metis and African ancestry. After graduating from Acadia University and an early career in theatre, he attended Concordia University in Montreal to pursue an MFA in Creative Writing. In keeping with the military traditions within his family, Johnson enrolled in the Canadian Forces as an Infantry Officer and was deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan in 2010. Now released from the military, Johnson is returning to a career in writing. He resides in Three Mile Plains, NS, his childhood home, and is in the MFA in Creative Nonfiction at University of King’s College in Halifax. Some Kind of Hero is a compelling account of the circumstances leading to Afghan vet Lionel Desmond’s tragic 2017 murder/suicide, and the lessons we need to learn from it.Miles Steyn — University of Victoria Steyn was born in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and raised in Vancouver. His creative nonfiction has appeared in Existere, The Xanadu Anthology, Unsubscribe Magazine, Gold Literary Magazine, and his essay “Wire to the Sky” was short-listed for EVENT Magazine‘s Creative Nonfiction Contest. In 2018, Steyn’s essay “From Clay” was long-listed for the CBC Nonfiction Prize. Expanding on the earlier essay, Wire to the Sky, Steyn’s first book of nonfiction is a genre-bending memoir, told through letters from a brother to his late sister, about race, nationality, and the loss of family.Joshua Whitehead — University of Calgary Whitehead is an Oji-Cree, Two-Spirit storyteller and academic from Peguis First Nation on Treaty 1 territory in Manitoba. He is currently working toward a Ph.D. in Indigenous literature and cultures at the University of Calgary. In 2016, his poem “mihkokwaniy” won Canada’s History Award for Aboriginal Arts and Stories (for writers aged 19–29), which included a residency at the Banff Centre. His 2018 novel, Jonny Appleseed, was shortlisted for the Governor General’s Award for Fiction. His non-fiction book, Making Love with The Land, is a braid of forms that ruminates on topics such as Indigeneity, queerness, mental health, body dysmorphia, and chronic pain through a variety of literary forms, including horror, speculative fiction, poetry, and confession.last_img read more

Allardyce insisted that he has fans support

first_imgSam Allardyce managed to avoid the relegation troubles after coming to Everton to replace Ronald Koeman in the first half of the season but his position has been doubted despite that.The former England national team has had a difficult position as it has been said that the majority of fans wants him to leave after the season and be replaced with someone younger and more perspective – but the coach doesn’t agree.The experienced Englishman spoke about his future as he said, according to Sports Mole:Jose Mourinho is sold on Lampard succeeding at Chelsea Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho wanted to give his two cents on Frank Lampard’s odds as the new Chelsea FC manager, he thinks he will succeed.There really…“I don’t really talk about my prudential or non-prudential outside of the fact that I do the job to do the best of my ability.”“Listening to what’s happening outside has a detrimental effect on you, good or bad, and my job is to accept what people think I am and who I am and I can’t change that because it’s happened over a long period of time.”“There are sceptical fans everywhere and there are very few of them at the moment. You’re talking about the minority instead of the majority.”last_img read more

Dimarco Scoring against Inter was destiny

first_imgParma defender Federico Dimarco reflects on scoring the only goal of the game as they beat Inter Milan at San Siro.Federico Dimarco came through the Inter academy and they still have an option to buy him. He was the hero on Saturday as he scored the only goal in a shock 1-0 victory for Parma at Inter Milan.Despite Inter dominating majority of the game, it was Dimarco who in the 79th minute scored a stunner to decide the game.“I think we deserved the victory because we fought hard as a group to the bitter end,” he told Sky Sports Italia.Rick Karsdorp, Roma, Serie AKarsdorp reveals he had too much stress at Roma Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 The Dutch defender has been with the Gialorrossi since 2017, but he has not enjoyed his time in the Italian Lega Serie A.Reporters were quick to compare his goal that of Roberto Carlos.“Let’s lot exaggerate with comparisons. I scored a goal and I’m happy. I dedicate this goal to my daughter, who will be born in a month.” Dimarco said.“I anticipated Matteo Politano and then saw a gap, so I hit it. It went well. I am a little sad that I scored it against Inter because I am an Interista at heart, but it’s an important goal for the present and the future.”last_img read more

RBDF Rangers graduate from Cadet Trainiing

first_img Related Items:#GuardOurHeritage Rangers Band Indoctrination CourseBest Male Band Cadet – Arawn RolleBest Female Band Cadet – Malania Oliver BAHAMAS: RBDF Basketball Tournament Recommended for you Rangers Advance Officer Candidate CourseMost Outstanding Cadet – Judy Forbes RBDF Familiarization ProgramMost Outstanding Cadet – Destiny SeymourPress Release: RBDFHeader photo shows: Royal Bahamas Defence Force Ranger Trainees that graduated from the RBDF Rangers Leadership Training School on August 4, 2017. The three-week course was held at the SURE facility, Gladstone Road. Seated in from are Commodore Tellis Bethel along with RBDF Officers and Warrant Officers and Senior Rates.Rangers Photo two shows: The Rangers Special Drill team performing a routine at the graduation ceremony for 82 Rangers trainees on August 4, 2017. The three-week course was held at the SURE facility, Gladstone Road.Rangers Photo three shows: The Rangers band performing a musical selection during the graduation ceremony for 82 Rangers trainees on August 4, 2017. The three-week course was held at the SURE facility, Gladstone Road.Rangers Photo four shows:  BTC’s Chief Marketing Officer Janet Brown receiving a presentation from Commodore Tellis Bethel as a token for being a corporate sponsor for the Rangers Leadership Training camp. At left: is Director of the Rangers program, Lieutenant Delvonne Duncombe, and on the right is Captain Clyde Sawyer, Captain Coral Harbour.Rangers Photo five shows: Ranger Xaria Laing receiving the Best Female Recruit Award during the graduation ceremony for 82 Rangers trainees on August 4, 2017. The three-week course was held at the SURE facility, Gladstone Road.(Photos by Marine Seaman Michael Turner)(For further information please contact the RBDF Public Relations Department or visit our website: www.rbdf.gov.bs, follow us on Facebook, Twitter and view our Youtube channel) -rbdf-#GuardOurHeritagecenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Bahamas joint effort recovers more bodies of Haitian migrants BAHAMAS: RBDF Personnell attend SeventhDay Adventist Thanksgiving Service Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, August 7, 2017 – Nassau – A total of 82 Ranger Trainees graduated from the Royal Bahamas Defence Force Rangers Leadership Training School on Friday past.    This was the culmination of a 3-week long program where the trainees between the ages of 12-20 years were pulled away from their usual daily comforts and immersed in an accelerated leadership program.Participants in the dynamic program represented Rangers from High Schools in New Providence, Grand Bahama, Abaco, North Andros and the Berry Islands.   The young Rangers were broken up into focused programs that included the Rangers Marine Candidate Indoctrination Course, Ranger Officer Training Course, Ranger Advanced Officer Training Course, At Risk Youth Reconditioning Course and the Ranger Band Indoctrination Course.Also included in the Rangers’ Leadership camp was a job preparedness workshop for the Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation (AMMC) historic regiment cadet.   This was aimed to prepare the Ranger graduates for the workplace as well as serving as tour guides in the AMMC’s Historical Regiment Cadet Core program.Topics and activities covered at the Ranger Leadership School included Positive Self-Awareness, Conflict Resolution, Right Choices, Field Expeditions, Self-Control, Problem Solving, Negotiating, Etiquette, Public Speaking, First Aid, Leadership, Physical Training, Positive Attitudes and Behaviors, Developing good work ethics, Band drills, and a host of others.Commodore Tellis Bethel, Commander Defence Force, hailed the program as one designed to prepare Rangers for employment in the Defence Force or the commercial maritime sector.   The program also encourages Rangers to pursue their vocational interests or academic studies beyond high school.   He stated that youth have an important part to play in national development and that the Defence Force’s Rangers program is preparing them for such a role.The Commander Defence Force thanked the Director of the Rangers program, Lieutenant Delvonne Duncombe, Ranger Instructors, the Defence Force Officers and Marines, as well as representatives from the Rangers Parents In Action Group for the outstanding work they did in making the program a success.   He also expressed the Defence Force’s appreciation for the support of corporate sponsors which included BTC and Bahamas Waste Ltd.    Additionally, he thanked the principal and staff at Program SURE for making their facilities available.Rangers who received outstanding awards during the program included:Rangers Officer Candidate CourseBest Male Recruit – Dikembe WilkinsonBest Female Recruit – Xaria Lainglast_img read more

Siewert says Huddersfield cannot compete with Chelsea

first_imgHuddersfield Town is in the last place of the English Premier League table and couldn’t even compete with Chelsea at Stamford Bridge.Huddersfield Town is dead-last in the English Premier League table with only 11 points after 25 matches.The team has only won twice, drawing five times and losing in 18 games.They are candidates to get demoted into the English Championship at the end of the 2018-2019 season.And after they were defeated 5-0 by giants Chelsea today, Huddersfield manager Jan Siewert says his team cannot compete.“We tried everything to beat them but they showed they are also very hungry because of their defeat against Bournemouth,” he told Sky Sports after today’s 5-0 defeat.“We missed several moments when we could have shot.”Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.“It’s possible to threaten but you have to shoot. Sometimes the ball goes for a corner or goes to goal, which is the important thing,” he commented.“It was a very bad moment for us. We had some chances before and then maybe we could have equalized before half-time and I’m not sure if it was a penalty.”“We have to work as intensely as possible and for my game, you need the right shape for that,” Siewert added.“To be intense and defend at the front is the most important thing. We have to work hard and continue.”“It’s definitely a test of character. Our fans were fantastic and we have to show that we are willing to win games,” the manager concluded.The team doesn’t have it easy.The next Saturday they will host Arsenal, only to visit Newcastle United and then receive the visit of Wolverhampton Wanderers.last_img read more

More than 1700 Hondurans headed for the Mexico border new caravan of

first_img AP AP, More than 1,700 Hondurans headed for the Mexico border, new caravan of migrants AGUA CALIENTE, Guatemala (AP) — More than 1,700 Hondurans were walking and hitchhiking through Guatemala on Wednesday, heading toward the Mexico border as part of a new caravan of migrants hoping to reach the United States.Over 1,700 migrants passed through the Agua Caliente border crossing under the watchful eyes of about 200 police and soldiers. Some migrants told The Associated Press that they crossed informally elsewhere.Guatemala’s National Immigration Institute said there were 325 children or youths under 18 in the caravan. There were also just over 100 people from El Salvador.Miria Zelaya, who left the Honduran city of Colon and was traveling with 12 relatives, said she did not know what sort of work she hopes to find in the United States but was not dismayed by tougher immigration policies under President Donald Trump.“That does not discourage me,” Zelaya said. “The need is greater.”Migrants leaving Central America’s Northern Triangle nations of Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala routinely cite widespread poverty, lack of opportunity and rampant gang violence as their motivation.Many in the group registered for 90-day visas in Guatemala, saying they felt it would offer peace of mind on the 300-mile (540-kilometer) trek to Mexico’s southern border.Hector Alvarado, a 25-year-old announcer, said he had been shut out of job opportunities for belonging to the political opposition and felt forced to leave to find work. He learned about the caravan on Facebook, said goodbye to relatives and hit the road.“My loved ones have already cried over of my leaving,” Alvarado said. “Now I have to press on.”The latest trek north comes as U.S. President Donald Trump has been working to convince the American public that there is a crisis at the southern border to justify construction of his long-promised border wall. Trump’s demand for billions of dollars to that end has resulted in a standoff with Congress that has forced a partial government shutdown.The fate that awaits the migrants at the Mexico-U.S. border is uncertain. Previous caravans that were seized upon last year by Trump in the run-up to the 2018 midterm election have quietly dwindled, with many having gone home to Central America or put down roots in Mexico. Many others — nearly half, according to U.S. Border Patrol arrest records — have sought to enter the U.S. illegally.About 6,000 Central Americans reached Tijuana in November amid conflict on both sides of the border over their presence in the Mexican city across from San Diego. As of earlier this week, fewer than 700 remained at a former outdoor concert venue in Tijuana that the Mexican government set up as a shelter to house them.Mexico has issued humanitarian visas to about 2,900 migrants from last fall’s caravan, many of whom are now working legally there with visas.Also Wednesday about 100 migrants set out as a group from the capital of El Salvador, hoping to join the larger group from Honduras. Their numbers represent less than a third of the estimated 350 migrants who leave El Salvador each day.“I can’t stay. I’m leaving because the gangs have threatened me — either I join them, or they’ll kill me,” said Adonay Hernandez, 22, who was carrying just $20 in his pocket but was confident he will make it to relatives in North Carolina. “God is my shield.”Others hoped to find a better life in Mexico, where they have options for applying for refuge and work permits.“I know that in Mexico they are helping us,” said Franklin Martinez, a 34-year-old traveling with his partner and their 2½-year-old daughter. “We are going to ask for refuge and we are going to stay and work. After we have saved enough, perhaps we will go to the United States, but our goal is to make it to Mexico.”Liduvina Margarin, vice minister for Salvadorans abroad, met with the migrants before they left a downtown plaza to warn them about the dangers of the northward route. She told them that more than half the Salvadorans who left in caravans have returned to the country.“Our duty is to say to you that you are never going to be better off than in your homeland, in your communities of origin,” Margarin said.Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said Wednesday that Mexico has been monitoring the latest caravan closely.He said the best option is for Central American governments to persuade their citizens to stay. Those who don’t will be allowed to enter Mexico in an orderly fashion and presented with options, and their human rights will be respected, Lopez Obrador added. January 16, 2019center_img Posted: January 16, 2019 Updated: 6:09 PM Categories: California News, Local San Diego News, National & International News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more