ASTON VILLA VS LEICESTER CITY

first_imgVILLA (4-1-4-1)GUZAN, HUTTON, OKORE, LESCOTT, BACUNA, SANCHEZ,WESTWOOD, VERETOUT, GANA, SINCLAIR, AYEWLEICESTER (4-4-2)VARDY, OKAZAKI,MAHREZ, KING, KANTE, ALBRIGHTON,DE LAET, FUCHS, MORGAN, SIMPSON,SCHMEICHELLeicester City are now level at the top of the Barclays Premier League with Arsenal after beating Spurs 1-0 at White Hart Lane on Wednesday thanks to Robert Huth’s late winner at White Hart Lane.It ended their run of three games without a league win, while Huth’s goal was Leicester’s first in 374 minutes.On Tuesday, Aston Villa claimed their first win in the Barclays Premier League in 157 days when they beat Crystal Palace 1-0 thanks to a goal from central defender Joleon Lescott.It was also Villa’s first Premier League win in 20 attempts, having lost 14 of the previous 19.They remain at the foot of the table and face high-riding Leicester City next.The most common Premier League result between these teams at Villa Park is a draw. In nine clashes, four have been drawn while Villa have won three and Leicester two.When they met at the King Power Stadium in September it was a remarkable game. Villa led 2-0 but Leicester struck three times in the final 18 minutes, with Nathan Dyer stealing an 89th-minute winner.last_img read more

Nothing to worry about: Ravindra Jadeja on India’s batting woes after loss to NZ

first_imgIndia’s batting frailties might have been exposed again in the first warm-up against New Zealand but spin-allrounder Ravindra Jadeja said there is “nothing to worry” and the team will sort out its weakness ahead of the World Cup beginning next week.Electing to bat, India suffered an early collapse in slightly bowling-friendly conditions at the Oval before being bowled out for 179 in 39.2 overs. Ravindra Jadeja’s 54 off 50 balls and Hardik Pandya’s 37-ball 30 were the only substantial scores.”This is our first game, it is just one game and we can’t judge players on one bad innings, one bad match. So nothing to worry as a batting unit,” Jadeja told reporters at the post-match press conference.”It is always difficult in England, you are coming from India, where you play in flat wicket … we still have time to work on it. There is nothing to worry, just keep playing good cricket.”As a batting unit we will work harder on our batting skills, everyone has a lot of experience, so nothing to worry.”Jadeja hoped India will get better wickets to bat during the World Cup.”It was typical English conditions, wicket was soft initially but it got better as day progressed. We hope we don’t get this much amount of grass and get a better wicket to bat in the World cup,” he said.Asked about India’s decision to bat first, Jadeja said: “We knew there will be seaming conditions, so we decided to bat to face tough conditions because if we bat in such conditions it will be easy for batsmen in actual matches. We took it as a challenge. We will do well, we have no doubt.”advertisementJadeja said he will look to play his natural game and not put himself under pressure during the showpiece event.”Everywhere I play, I will continue doing what I do. I will not put pressure on myself thinking about the world cup, will try to keep it simple,” he said.Jadeja blasted 54 off 50 balls studded with six fours and two sixes.Talking about his innings, Jadeja said: “I had a lot of time, there were lot of overs. So I was talking to myself to not get the shot selection wrong. There was no rush. I knew if I can clear the initial overs, it will be helpful for me and that is what happened,” he said.”I was working on my batting during IPL. Whenever I get a chance, I go to the nets and work on technique and shot selection.”.Also Read | World Cup 2019 warm-up: India lose to New Zealand after star batsmen flopAlso Read | Lower-order runs were good positives: Virat Kohli after loss to NZ in World Cup warm-uplast_img read more

RAINE MAIDA AND CHANTAL KREVIAZUK REFLECT ON MARITAL STRUGGLES IN DOCUMENTARY

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement TORONTO — Raine Maida and Chantal Kreviazuk are no strangers to putting their marriage on display for public scrutiny, but in their new documentary “I’m Going to Break Your Heart” the musicians go a step further by inviting cameras into some uncomfortably tense situations.In one scene, the couple spiral into an argument over creative freedom while composing a song together, and in another the layers of their emotional disconnection are peeled back with the help of a marriage counsellor.It’s the kind of access you rarely see from Canadian musicians, who don’t often speak openly about relationships. But Maida suggests there’s value in revealing the steps they’ve taken to mend fractures that formed throughout 19 years of marriage and parenting three children. “I don’t think we’re embarrassed by it,” the Our Lady Peace frontman says while sitting alongside his wife. “I would’ve been five years ago.”Canadian musical couple Chantal Kreviazuk and Raine Maida (Publicity photo)Kreviazuk chimes in with a more decisive perspective on the emotional rawness she portrays in the counselling sessions.“I think it would be great to not be embarrassed of that — if we could all not be so worried about what other people think,” she says.“I love excellence but the place I most want it is in my home and with my partner. That’s my No. 1 priority.”At the centre of “I’m Going to Break Your Heart,” showing at Calgary’s National Music Centre on Feb. 8, is the quest for the couple to rediscover passion for each other through music.After five years of stalled plans, they resolve to escape their daily demands and temporarily resettle in Saint Pierre and Miquelon, a self-governing archipelago off the coast of Newfoundland that’s a territory of France.The isolated environment offers the setting for their project Moon vs. Sun, in which they create and perform music as a duo, to finally take shape. Kreviazuk and Maida push through late-night songwriting sessions where they clash over how to express their vision. Their single “Lowlight” is due for release on Friday.Planning to bring their project to cities across the country as part of a concert tour later this year, they’ll also launch a podcast tentatively called “The Together Space” which interviews other couples who collaborate in their work.“I don’t think you’d really understand these songs if you don’t (see) how they were conceived — that context is so crucial,” Maida says.“It doesn’t really make sense to just show the songwriting if you don’t show the process of us in a relationship.”Shaping that footage into a documentary proved more frustrating than either of them expected, Maida says. Certain editors felt the story thrived on the clashes, rather than the creation of their album, so he says they would splice together separate therapy sessions to ratchet up the conflict.“We saw some edits that we were like, ‘Why are you trying to make us look like we don’t love each other?”‘ Kreviazuk adds, pointing out they’ve participated in marriage coaching for 12 years.“You can really play with that (and) make it look like dart after dart with no space for healing.”Maida, 48, says watching an outsider’s version of the film take shape led him to seriously consider learning post-production software so that he could recut the film himself.“I saw how quickly a choice could be made that just shifted the whole thing,” he says.“It was inauthentic. Never mind it made us look terrible, it was like you’re telling lies now. We’re trying to be as real, open and honest as possible and now you’re manipulating that. And so, you’re fired. And so we went through this process for a year.”Eventually the documentary began screening for test audiences in Los Angeles and the couple listened while others dissected their relationship. Fingers were pointed in both directions, with some saying Maida acted like a jerk while Kreviazuk came across as needy.“People were laughing,” Maida remembers. “They were angry. They said, ‘Would you get divorced?”‘Kreviazuk, 44, says she’s come to accept that viewers might insert their own experiences into her marriage, but she prefers to focus on the positivity the documentary is bringing out.Since the film’s trailer debuted earlier this month she’s heard fans say it inspired them to reconnect with their own partners. She’s saving those messages on her phone as a reminder that speaking about the ups and downs of their marriage has rewards.“I don’t really care if somebody thinks it’s a fail, because all I see here is a massive success,” Kreviazuk says.“I often feel like we’ve been together so long that it’s him and I against the world. I really love that.”By David Friend | The Associated Press – Follow @dfriend on Twitter.last_img read more