RAINE MAIDA AND CHANTAL KREVIAZUK REFLECT ON MARITAL STRUGGLES IN DOCUMENTARY

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement TORONTO — Raine Maida and Chantal Kreviazuk are no strangers to putting their marriage on display for public scrutiny, but in their new documentary “I’m Going to Break Your Heart” the musicians go a step further by inviting cameras into some uncomfortably tense situations.In one scene, the couple spiral into an argument over creative freedom while composing a song together, and in another the layers of their emotional disconnection are peeled back with the help of a marriage counsellor.It’s the kind of access you rarely see from Canadian musicians, who don’t often speak openly about relationships. But Maida suggests there’s value in revealing the steps they’ve taken to mend fractures that formed throughout 19 years of marriage and parenting three children. “I don’t think we’re embarrassed by it,” the Our Lady Peace frontman says while sitting alongside his wife. “I would’ve been five years ago.”Canadian musical couple Chantal Kreviazuk and Raine Maida (Publicity photo)Kreviazuk chimes in with a more decisive perspective on the emotional rawness she portrays in the counselling sessions.“I think it would be great to not be embarrassed of that — if we could all not be so worried about what other people think,” she says.“I love excellence but the place I most want it is in my home and with my partner. That’s my No. 1 priority.”At the centre of “I’m Going to Break Your Heart,” showing at Calgary’s National Music Centre on Feb. 8, is the quest for the couple to rediscover passion for each other through music.After five years of stalled plans, they resolve to escape their daily demands and temporarily resettle in Saint Pierre and Miquelon, a self-governing archipelago off the coast of Newfoundland that’s a territory of France.The isolated environment offers the setting for their project Moon vs. Sun, in which they create and perform music as a duo, to finally take shape. Kreviazuk and Maida push through late-night songwriting sessions where they clash over how to express their vision. Their single “Lowlight” is due for release on Friday.Planning to bring their project to cities across the country as part of a concert tour later this year, they’ll also launch a podcast tentatively called “The Together Space” which interviews other couples who collaborate in their work.“I don’t think you’d really understand these songs if you don’t (see) how they were conceived — that context is so crucial,” Maida says.“It doesn’t really make sense to just show the songwriting if you don’t show the process of us in a relationship.”Shaping that footage into a documentary proved more frustrating than either of them expected, Maida says. Certain editors felt the story thrived on the clashes, rather than the creation of their album, so he says they would splice together separate therapy sessions to ratchet up the conflict.“We saw some edits that we were like, ‘Why are you trying to make us look like we don’t love each other?”‘ Kreviazuk adds, pointing out they’ve participated in marriage coaching for 12 years.“You can really play with that (and) make it look like dart after dart with no space for healing.”Maida, 48, says watching an outsider’s version of the film take shape led him to seriously consider learning post-production software so that he could recut the film himself.“I saw how quickly a choice could be made that just shifted the whole thing,” he says.“It was inauthentic. Never mind it made us look terrible, it was like you’re telling lies now. We’re trying to be as real, open and honest as possible and now you’re manipulating that. And so, you’re fired. And so we went through this process for a year.”Eventually the documentary began screening for test audiences in Los Angeles and the couple listened while others dissected their relationship. Fingers were pointed in both directions, with some saying Maida acted like a jerk while Kreviazuk came across as needy.“People were laughing,” Maida remembers. “They were angry. They said, ‘Would you get divorced?”‘Kreviazuk, 44, says she’s come to accept that viewers might insert their own experiences into her marriage, but she prefers to focus on the positivity the documentary is bringing out.Since the film’s trailer debuted earlier this month she’s heard fans say it inspired them to reconnect with their own partners. She’s saving those messages on her phone as a reminder that speaking about the ups and downs of their marriage has rewards.“I don’t really care if somebody thinks it’s a fail, because all I see here is a massive success,” Kreviazuk says.“I often feel like we’ve been together so long that it’s him and I against the world. I really love that.”By David Friend | The Associated Press – Follow @dfriend on Twitter.last_img read more

Enoch Cree say Canada never mentioned bombs found on land returned to

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe leader of the Enoch Cree Nation announced there may be unexploded munitions on their land.Part of their land was used as a practice bombing range during the Second World War.On Tuesday, Enoch’s chief called on Canada to investigate.APTN’s Keith Laboucan has this story.last_img

Tom Mulcair repeats promise to call MMIW inquiry if elected prime minister

first_imgAPTN National NewsNDP leader Tom Mulcair made a campaign stop in Saskatoon Monday.He promised millions to support ending violence against women.APTN’s Larissa Burnouf also reports he repeated a promise for missing and murdered women, too.last_img

BCs mental health services failed First Nation youth who committed suicide report

first_imgAPTN National NewsA 16-year-old Indigenous youth who committed suicide in a forest was failed by British Columbia’s mental health services, says a new report by the province’s children and youth representative.The boy, who was identified as “Chester” in the report to protect the privacy of his family and community, exhibited signs of serious mental health issues before his 2013 death but received little in any help from the organizations created to provide the help he needed, said the report.The report titled, A Tragedy in Waiting, said little has improved with the province’s mental health services since the tragedy which the report said was the result of non-existent proper assessments for the boy.The report said miscommunication and lack of follow-up created the perception treatment through Aboriginal Child and Youth Mental Health Services would be hampered by extremely long wait lists along with a false sense that the youth was already receiving enough support.“One might think that when faced with a tragedy such as a teenager taking his own life, providing treatment for mental illnesses for Aboriginal children and youth would become a top priority for government, but that has not happened,” said Children and Youth Representative Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, in a statement. “In May 2013, we lost a bright and creative young man who should still be here. Three years later, wait lists for services in this youth’s area—close to an urban centre—are still on-average 270 days, or nearly nine months. This is nothing short of cruel.”The report said that the Aboriginal agency in the youth’s area was operating below an acceptable standard and was not being properly supported by the Minister of Children and Family Development.The report said the agency couldn’t help the youth adequately because it was more concerned with organizing its records for a ministry audit and quality review.“This DAA had been struggling for years with little aid from the ministry, which is required by law to support it,” said Turpel-Lafond. “Actions taken by MCFD did not adequately address the lack of capacity in the DAA until well after Chester’s death and it remains unclear whether these issues have been resolved in a sustainable manner.”The report called on the government to increase resources to reduce the wait list for Aboriginal children and youth mental health services.It also called for the creation of a “proactive lead agency” in conjunction with Ottawa and First Nations to deliver Aboriginal and youth mental health services.“There has been much talk about reconciliation and placing children at the centre, but so little has been done to make improvements that it is impossible to say the system has progressed at all since Chester died,” said Turpel-Lafond. “Children are waiting and waiting and waiting. Even now, some children in Chester’s region are waiting as long as 12 months for services in a major urban area. This is essentially a denial of service. Quite simply, we must do better.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

Standing Rock camp recovering from latest clash with police waiting on word

first_imgTom FennarioAPTN National NewsThe aftermath of Sunday’s clash between #NoDAPL supporters and police continues to emerge.A New York City based activist who is now in danger of losing her arm.And police are blaming protestors — and protestors are blaming police.Now people at the camp are eagerly waiting on word on her condition.tfennario@aptn.calast_img

Trudeaus support of Kinder Morgan leading to a flashpoint of Indigenous resistance

first_imgNation to NationPrime Minister Justin Trudeau lied to Indigenous people when he said there was no relationship more important to him than with the First Peoples of this land when he was elected in 2015, says a grand chief in Quebec.Grand Chief Serge Simon of the Kanesatake Mohawk Council said the proof is in Trudeau’s tireless support of expanding Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline.Earlier this week, the federal government said it will go as far as pay Kinder Morgan for any costs for construction delays and are still considering passing new laws to put the pipeline in the ground from Alberta to Burnaby, B.C.“Trudeau has said in the past his most important relationship was that with the First Nations and with this that is proving that was a lie. It’s not true,” said Simon on Nation to Nation Thursday.“It’s very alarming that the government would go that far to protect an outside interest like Kinder Morgan, a Texas-based corporation.”Watch the full episode of Nation to Nation below: Simon is a member of the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion, a group of 150 First Nations and Tribes across Turtle Island.The group was formed to fight pipeline projects through their territories and right now it has its sights set on Kinder Morgan.But in the end, it’s about recognition of rights said Simon.“That’s what’s at the centre of this whole thing; it’s that recognition they don’t want to give,” said Simon.Simon has seen this unfold before.He remembers when the Oka Crisis unfolded 28 years ago in summer of 1990 during the Battle of the Pines triggered by the Village of Oka’s desire to expand a golf course over Mohawk burial grounds. One person died and it’s something Simon said no one wants to see happen again.But if rights are not respected he said it’s inevitable.“If you are going to push industry concerns over First Nation concerns on our territory you are going to see a flashpoint somewhere,” he said. “I’m really hoping for my friends in B.C. that it doesn’t go that way for them.”The Trudeau government has refused to rule out using force to build Kinder Morgan’s pipeline and there has already been hundreds of arrests.It’s a project Trudeau has already approved and his government says First Nations and Metis groups were consulted beforehand. However, support for the project has dropped from 51 deals to 44 between to Kinder Morgan and Indigenous groups.Some that have supported it say they felt they didn’t have a choice. In fact, Yale First Nation signed a deal because it was so beaten down and broke from colonization and the “worst” treaty agreement in Canada. It needed Kinder Morgan’s money to keep from going into third-party management.Serge Simon, a Mohawk, should keep his nose in his own business. His community is located thousands of miles from the Kinder Morgan Expansion Project. Simon has no Aboriginal rights in either Alberta or B.C.— Ernie Crey (@Cheyom1) May 16, 2018While others like Cheam First Nation, or at least its chief Ernie Crey, say the pipeline is better than transporting the bitumen by train.Crey has been outspoken on Twitter about Simon speaking about the pipeline saying he holds no rights in Alberta or B.C. and should stay out of it.“He can say whatever he wants. It’s a debate we’ll have to have somewhere down the line whether I have that right or not,” said Simon.N2N@aptn.calast_img read more

Despite improved services for Inuit detainees arduous travel yet to be addressed

first_imgTom FennarioAPTN NewsA heavy metal door springs to life and slides open, letting Josiane Gendron walk into Sector B of the detention centre in Amos, Quebec.“We are in the living quarters, sector B,” said Gendron, the assistant director of the new $125 million Amos facility that opened its doors in Nov. 2018.Sector B is currently empty.Natural light spills into the shared living space. Tables and chairs freshly painted different shades of grey with yellow highlights to impart some colour.The cells are located on two floors, single rooms on the top, doubles on the bottom.“The cells are open from 8:30 in the morning until 10:30 at night,” said Gendron. “So they have access to this room [lower level common area] during the day.”Gendron said it’s a vast improvement over the old Amos prison that was notorious for overcrowding.“Because there’s more room, in here, a bigger capacity, we were able to respect the agreement we have the KRG [Kativik Regional Government] and the Makivik corporation to group all the Inuit, the preventative custody Inuit, here in Amos.”(Josiane Gendron, assistant director of the Amos detention centre. Photo: Tom Fennario/APTN)On average, Inuit detainees make up more than a third of the 160 inmates here.Unique to other prisons in Quebec, this facility also has a room designated for Inuit cultural activities.Including a space to prepare traditional food that has a mural of a northern landscape on the wall.“The painting was made by an incarcerated person from Cree and Inuit origin, so we hired him to do this painting to kind of give the feel of the north,” said Gendron.(A mural on a prison wall depicting their traditional land is an apt metaphor for Inuit detained here. Photo: Tom Fennario/APTN)In many ways they are stuck between two worlds.Nunavik, the Inuit territory in subarctic Quebec, doesn’t have its own prison, so Inuit are ferried by plane back and forth – more than a thousand kilometres each way – from the time they’re arrested – to the end of their trial.And depending on their case, or the weather, the time spent here can be extended by weeks or months.As a result, Inuit spend significantly more time in custody than non-Inuit detainees, which makes it a human rights issue.“Inuit rights are regularly infringed on, Inuit rights are not respected,” testified Lucy Grey at in November 2018 at a Quebec Inquiry into Indigenous Relations with Certain Public Services hearing In Kuujjuaq, QC.Grey has held many titles within the justice system in Nunavik, from court translator to justice committee co-ordinator, to director of the Makitautik halfway house for Inuit offenders.As a result, she had much to say about how justice is administered in Nunavik over the course of her impassioned hour long testimony.“These Inuit are put in Amos, totally isolated, no one there to protect them, no one there to ease them, no one there to insure that they are corrected,” said Grey at the hearing “they always regularly come back more damaged, more hurt, and then they become repeat offenders.”Grey isn’t the only one to lament the treatment of Inuit detainees.A 2016 report by Quebec’s ombudsmen laid out dozens of recommendations to improve justice in Nunavik.Most of which have been implemented, including improved services for Inuit at Amos, such as adult education.“We have five classrooms,” said Gendron. “We will have a full time teacher in August, who will be hired by the Kativik school board.”(Sector B at the Amos detention facility. Photo: Tom Fennario/APTN)But as Grey points out, getting Inuktitut speakers to Amos is not easy.Located in the Abitibi region of Quebec, Amos is almost 600 kilometres northwest of Montreal.And about 1,200 kilometres from Nunavik’s closest courthouse where trials are held.But Quebec has grouped Nunavik into the same judicial district as Abitibi despite the vast distance between the two regions.“Abitibi might as well be across the ocean. Abitibi might as well be near Australia. We have no connection to Abitibi,” testified Grey, who adds there’s more Inuit resources in the Montreal region then Abitibi.The Quebec ombudsmen report did make two specific recommendations to cut down on arduous travel.Two and a half years later neither of which has been fully implemented.One is the creation of direct flights from Nunavik villages to Amos, instead of going through Montreal or the Abitibi hub of Val d’Or and then bussing to Amos.“It’s coming, it’s in development, we’ve no dates of when it’s going to come, but it’s definitely in the talks,” said Gendron.(The new facility is 600 km northwest of Montreal, and 1,200 km from the nearest courthouse in Nunavik. Photo: Tom Fennario/APTN)In an email to APTN News, Quebec’s Ministry of Public Security says it needed to wait for construction of the Amos prison to be finished and a new policing agreement for the Kativik police force, who help escort the prisoners, before acting on direct air lifts.They also said that the first direct flight from Nunavik to Amos took place on July 4, but at the moment, it’s a pilot project and will only continue periodically.As for the other solution to cut down on travel, using video conferencing for trial appearances, Gendron said the Amos prison is ready.“Because of the internet link with the north, with Nunavik, it’s not been developed yet, it’s not taken place yet,” Gendron explained.But the a spokesperson for the Kativik Regional Government, who administer services in Nunavik, say that internet speed is not the hold up, but rather negotiations with Quebec, which are ongoing.Judging from the sound of frustration in her voice, for Lucy Grey these improvements cannot come soon enough.“You know, Inuit are very forgiving, and the white, Qallunaat, “oui-oui”s kind of have a hard time with that, they want to punish. Punish. But the intention of justice is to bring social harmony and this version is not bringing harmony.“It’s bringing chaos.”tfennario@aptn.ca@tfennariolast_img read more

US construction spending up a strong 14 per cent in October

first_imgWASHINGTON – U.S. construction spending surged 1.4 per cent in October, the best gain in five months, with all major categories of building posting gains.The October spending increase was the third monthly gain after more modest advances of 0.3 per cent in September and 0.5 per cent in August, the Commerce Department said Friday.Home building was up 0.4 per cent, with strength in single-family construction offsetting a drop in apartment building. Nonresidential construction rose 0.9 per cent after four straight declines. Spending on government projects jumped 3.9 per cent, the biggest one-month gain in three years, with spending at the federal and state and local levels all showing increases.Though home building has been weak for much of the year, economists expect such construction to rebound as a strong job market boosts sales in coming months.The overall economy grew at a healthy annual rate of 3.3 per cent in the July-September quarter, the best showing in three years, even though residential construction declined for a second straight quarter. But economists remain optimistic that the low level of unemployment — 4.1 per cent in October — will spark a sustained rebound in sales and construction.The strength in October was evident in all major sectors of construction. The rise in housing construction reflected a 0.3 per cent gain in single-family homes, which offset a 1.6 per cent drop in the smaller apartment category.In the non-residential area, office building was up a strong 4.4 per cent, and hotel construction rose 2.3 per cent. Those gains offset a 1.9 per cent fall in the category that covers shopping centres.In government categories, spending at the state and local level rose 3.3 per cent, while spending on federal projects jumped 11.1 per cent.last_img read more

Ontario offers incentives for electric vehicle charging stations at workplaces

first_imgTORONTO – Ontario is offering to cover 80 per cent of the cost of installing electric vehicle charging stations for companies and commercial building owners as the province tries to expand its charging infrastructure.The program, announced today, will cover most of the capital costs of installing Level 2 charging stations, which take between four and eight hours to fully charge an electric vehicle.Employers and commercial building owners could get up to $7,500 per charging space.The Liberal government has earmarked up to $5 million for the program out of cap-and-trade auction revenues.It says there are more than 1,300 public chargers operating in the province, though that includes just two-thirds of 500 stations promised by March 31, 2017 under a $20-million Electric Vehicle Chargers Ontario program.The government says an incentive program for home charging stations has doled out about $2.2 million since January 2013 for nearly 2,600 chargers.last_img read more

Loonie recovers following dovish interest rate hike Dow soars past 26000

first_imgTORONTO – The loonie rebounded from its earlier losses following the Bank of Canada’s dovish interest rate hike announcement Wednesday, as Wall Street soared to new highs.The Canadian dollar closed at an average trading value of 80.48 cents US, down 0.04 of a U.S. cent, recovering from greater losses earlier in the session after the central bank said it would raise its key interest rate target by a quarter of a percentage point to 1.25 per cent.While the rate hike was widely expected, investors were initially taken aback by the central bank’s cautious tone about future rate hikes.“Typically when markets are uncertain, a rate hike will lead to a stronger loonie. But in this case the rate hike itself was already reflected in market prices … so the real question on investors’ minds was would the Bank of Canada provide more hawkish guidance about future rate hikes?” said Todd Mattina, a chief economist at Mackenzie Investments.“In this case the Bank of Canada highlighted a number of reasons why it would be cautious going forward, which led to the market seeing it as a dovish rate hike.”While the central bank signalled more rate increases are likely over time, it noted the unknowns surrounding the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement — and the potential negatives for Canada — were casting a widening shadow over its outlook.The bank said “some continued monetary policy accommodation will likely be needed” to keep the economy operating close to its full potential.The central bank pointed to unexpectedly solid economic numbers as key drivers behind its decision to hike the rate to 1.25 per cent, up from one per cent. The increase followed hikes in July and September.In equity markets, U.S. stocks moved broadly higher, as the Dow Jones industrial average surged 322.79 points to 26,115.65, closing above 26,000 for the first time. The S&P 500 index was up 26.14 points to 2,802.56 and the Nasdaq composite index was up 74.59 points to 7,298.28.With Wall Street reaching records so often, 1,000-point moves in the Dow have become increasingly commonplace. It’s been just eight trading days since the Dow had its first close above 25,000.Technology and health-care companies accounted for much of the U.S. gains.North of the border, it was a fairly muted day on the S&P/TSX composite index, which rose a modest 27.82 points to 16,326.70, with the health-care, base metals and energy sectors among key advancers.“The TSX is underperforming the U.S. markets,” said Mattina. “It’s really a story of the stronger U.S. marketplace and a bit of a trickle down effect for the TSX.”In commodities, the February crude contract was up 24 cents to US$63.97 per barrel and the February natural gas contract added 10 cents to US$3.23 per mmBTU.The February gold contract was up US$2.10 cents to US$1,339.20 an ounce and the March copper contract was down three cents to US$3.19 a pound.– With a file from The Associated Press.Follow @DaveHTO on Twitter.last_img read more

Feds 3rd hike this year expected despite rising trade risks

first_imgWASHINGTON – The Federal Reserve is set this week to raise interest rates for a third time this year to prevent the economy from growing too fast. But with President Donald Trump’s trade fights posing a risk to the U.S. economy, the Fed may soon be ready to slow its hikes.Many analysts expect the economy to weaken next year, in part from the effects of the conflicts Trump has pursued with China, Canada, Europe and other trading partners. The tariffs and counter-tariffs that have been imposed on imports and exports is having the effect of raising prices for key goods and supplies and potentially slowing growth.An economic slowdown would likely lead the Fed to throttle back on its rate increases to avoid stifling growth. In that scenario, it might raise rates only twice in 2019 and then retreat to the sidelines to see how the economy fares.Compounding the effects of the tariffs and retaliatory tariffs resulting from Trump’s trade war, other factors could slow growth next year. The benefits of tax cuts that took effect this year, along with increased government spending, for example, are widely expected to fade.Still, some analysts hold to a more optimistic scenario: That momentum already built up from the government’s economic stimulus will keep strengthening the job market and lowering unemployment — at 3.9 per cent, already near a 50-year low. A tight employment market, in this scenario, will accelerate wages and inflation and prod the Fed to keep tightening credit to ensure that the economy doesn’t overheat.Any light the Fed might shed on those questions could come in the statement it will make after its latest policy meeting ends Wednesday, in updated economic and rate forecasts it will issue or in a news conference that Chairman Jerome Powell will hold afterward.The modest rate increase that’s widely expected reflects the continued strength of the U.S. economy, now in its 10th year of expansion, the second-longest such stretch on record. Most analysts also expect the Fed to signal that it plans to raise rates a fourth and final time this year, presumably in December. The Fed’s rate increases typically lead to higher rates on some consumer and business loans.Should neither Powell nor the Fed itself clarify expectations for the months ahead, it could be because the policymakers are sharply divided and are coalescing into two familiar opposing groups — “hawks” and “doves.”Doves focus on the Fed’s mandate to maximize employment and worry less about inflation. Hawks tend to concern themselves more with the need to prevent high inflation. One Fed board member, Lael Brainard, a leading dove, earlier this month surprised some with a speech that emphasized her belief in the need for continued gradual rate hikes.This week’s expected hike will be the Fed’s eighth since 2015, when it began tightening credit after having kept its benchmark rate at a record low for seven years beginning in 2008 at the height of the financial crisis.Even so, the Fed’s key short-term rate, a benchmark for many consumer and business loans, remains in a relatively low range of 1.75 per cent to 2 per cent. By its latest reckoning, the Fed estimates its “neutral rate” — the point where it’s thought to neither stimulate nor restrain growth — at around 2.9 per cent. Two more hikes this year and two in 2019 would lift the Fed’s benchmark rate to that level.In her speech, Brainard suggested that the Fed might eventually see a need to exceed the neutral rate — an unexpected observation from an official who has never been seen as a hawk. But Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, said Brainard’s suggestion doesn’t seem all that surprising given the economic circumstances.“She realizes that the economy is in a different place,” Zandi said. “We have had massive tax cuts and massive increases in government spending that were not even on the radar screen in early 2017.”The economy, as measured by the gross domestic product, is expected to grow 3 per cent for 2018 as a whole. That would mark the strongest full-year gain in 13 years. For the first nine years of the economic expansion, annual GDP growth averaged only around 2.2 per cent.The robust job market has helped make consumers, the main drivers of growth, more confident than they’ve been in nearly 18 years. Business investment is up. Americans are spending freely on cars, clothes and restaurant meals.All the good news has helped fuel a stock market rally. Household wealth is up, too. It reached a record in the April-June quarter, although the gain is concentrated largely among the most affluent.It’s that strength that has convinced economists that there will be little debate about raising rates this week.“For 2018, both the economy and the stock market are sizzling,” said Sung Won Sohn, chief economist at SS Economics, a consulting firm. “That means the Fed will stay with the four rate hikes they have indicated they will make this year.Next year is far less clear. Many economists worry that Trump’s combative trade policies could significantly slow the economy. Trump insists that the tariffs he is imposing on Chinese imports, to which Beijing has retaliated, are needed to force China to halt unfair trading practices. But concern is growing that China won’t change its practices, the higher tariffs on U.S. and Chinese goods will become permanent and both economies — the world’s two largest — will suffer.Powell has so far been circumspect in reflecting on Trump’s trade war. The Fed chairman has suggested that while higher tariffs are generally harmful, they could serve a healthy purpose if they eventually force Beijing to liberalize its trade practices.In the meantime, economists are divided over how many Fed rate increases are likely in 2019. Sohn foresees three. But Diane Swonk, chief economist at Grant Thornton, said she thinks the Fed will slow its pace to two hikes next year.“I think the higher tariffs will start to impact the economy,” Swonk said. “But I don’t think the Fed will signal any changes in its expected pace of interest rates at this meeting. The Fed will want to wait and react to changes in the economy.”last_img read more

Corus chief operating officer Barb Williams retiring at the end of October

first_imgTORONTO – Corus Entertainment Inc. says chief operating officer Barb Williams will retire at the end of the month.Williams joined the company as part of its acquisition of Shaw Media.Corus acquired Shaw Media in April 2016 for $2.65 billion in cash and stock.The company says Williams played a key role in the integration of the two companies.It says it will not be filling the role of chief operating officer.Corus owns specialty and conventional television stations, including the Global Television network as well as radio stations, a children’s book publishing business and other services.Companies in this story: (TSX:CJR.B)last_img read more

The Latest Germany preparing also for nodeal Brexit

first_imgLONDON — The Latest on Britain’s exit from the European Union (all times local):10:55 a.m.Germany’s finance minister says Berlin still hopes for a regulated British exit from the European Union but that the country is also prepared for the possibility of a Brexit without a negotiated deal.Olaf Scholz, who is also the vice chancellor, was quoted by the Passauer Neue Presse newspaper Friday as saying that an unregulated Brexit would be bad for everyone, and hit the British the worst.But, he says, “we are preparing ourselves very carefully for both variants, the controlled and the uncontrolled Brexit. Both present us with challenges, but we can and will manage them.”___10:00 a.m.European Union diplomats are meeting to finalize the draft divorce agreement between Britain and the bloc, amid a warning from Spain that it will oppose the deal if it isn’t guaranteed a say over the future of Gibraltar.Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez tweeted that Britain and Spain “remain far away” on the issue and “if there are no changes, we will veto Brexit.”Spain wants the future of the tiny British territory at the tip of the Iberian Peninsula to be a bilateral issue between Madrid and London.Spain doesn’t have a veto on the withdrawal agreement, which does not have to be approved unanimously. But it could hold up a future free-trade deal between Britain and the EU, which would require approval of all 27 EU nations.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Snowfall warning issued for the Alberta Peace

first_imgSee the full warning below.Issued at 2018-11-15 11:28 UTC by Environment Canada:Snowfall warning issued for:Co. of Grande Prairie near Beaverlodge Hythe and Demmitt, Alta. (077111)Co. of Grande Prairie near Sexsmith and La Glace, Alta. (077112)Co. of Grande Prairie near Grande Prairie and Wembley, Alta. (077113)Current details:An approaching low-pressure system will cause snow to fall over portions of western and central Alberta today and tonight. Snow will begin near the BC border this morning and spread southeastward through the day.By the time snow ends Friday morning, 10 to 15 cm of snow is expected, although isolated pockets of 20 cm are possible.Snowfall warnings are issued when 10 cm of snow or more is expected to fall within 12 hours or less.Visibility may be suddenly reduced at times in heavy snow. Surfaces such as highways, roads, walkways and parking lots may become difficult to navigate due to accumulating snow. Be prepared to adjust your driving with changing road conditions. If visibility is reduced while driving, slow down, watch for tail lights ahead and be prepared to stop.Please continue to monitor alerts and forecasts issued by Environment Canada. To report severe weather, send an email to ABstorm@canada.ca or tweet reports using #ABStorm.More details on the alert are available here. GRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – A snowfall warning has been issued for the Alberta Peace.  Total accumulations could be anywhere from 10 to 20 cm.The snow will start Thursday morning near the B.C. Alberta border and will spread throughout the day.  In the B.C. Peace total snowfall will only be 2 to 4 cm.The warning says by the time snow ends Friday morning, 10 to 15 cm of snow is expected, although isolated pockets of 20 cm are possible.last_img read more

The return of the RBC Taylor Prize Emerging Writers Mentorship Program

first_imgNadina Taylor, a trustee of the Charles Taylor Foundation and daughter of the late Charles Taylor, is a strong champion of the program. “We’ve seen what a huge impact the RBC Taylor Prize Emerging Writer Award can have on a writer’s career and wanted to amplify that effect with this opportunity – to help prepare these talented writers for the complex and competitive world of writing and publishing.”“At RBC Wealth Management, we believe it is important to identify, nurture and support the next generation of Canadian talent and to provide writers in the early stages of their career with mentorship opportunities that will help them succeed in the professional world,” said Vijay Parmar, President of RBC PH&N Investment Counsel.Helen Knott of Fort St. John is one of the five “emergent” writers who have an existing body of work, and a non-fiction manuscript close to completion. The participants will correspond with their mentors prior to travelling to Toronto for the Prize weekend, Feb 28 through March 4th. When the participants meet with their mentors, they will participate in an intensive day of professional development, accompany their mentors through media and events, and participate in the Awards Luncheon on Monday, March 4th.Helen Knott — University of Northern British Columbia Knott is of Dane Zaa, Nehiyaw, and mixed Euro descent from Prophet River First Nations, living in Fort St. John, BC. She has published short stories and poetry in the Malahat Review, Red Rising Magazine, through CBC Arts, the Surviving Canada Anthology, alongside other publications and poetry video productions. In 2017, Helen was a recipient of the REVEAL Indigenous Art Award. In 2016, she was one of sixteen women featured globally by the Nobel Women’s Initiative for her commitment to ending gender-based violence and activism. Her first book, In My Own Moccasins: A Memoir of Struggle and Resilience, will be released in August 2019. She is currently writing an Indigenous female manifesto entitled, Taking Back the Bones, where a personal narrative is interwoven with humour, academic research and critical reflection.The RBC Taylor Prize was established in 1998 by the trustees of the Charles Taylor Foundation and first awarded in 2000, 2018 marks the seventeenth year of awarding the RBC Taylor Prize, which commemorates Charles Taylor’s pursuit of excellence in the field of literary non-fiction. The Prize is awarded to the author whose book best combines a superb command of the English language, an elegance of style, and a subtlety of thought and perception. All finalists receive $5,000, and the winner receives a further $25,000. All authors are presented with a custom leather-bound version of their shortlisted book at the award ceremony. All finalists receive promotional support for their nominated titles.The four other participants of the 2019 RBC Taylor Prize Emerging Writers Mentorship Program are; TORONTO, ONT – The RBC Taylor Prize and the RBC Foundation announced the return of this professional development program, that is aimed to support the next generation of Canadian writers.The program pairs five emerging writers, selected from the nation’s writing programs, with the finalists for the 2019 RBC Taylor Prize. The award honours and celebrates the pursuit of excellence in literary non-fiction.The program is curated by Joe Kertes, Dean Emeritus of the Humber College School of Creative Arts & Performance in Toronto. The trustees of the Charles Taylor Foundation are; Vijay Parmar, David Staines, Edward Taylor, Nadina Taylor, and Noreen Taylor. The Prize Manager is Sheila Kay.center_img Becky Blake — University of Guelph Blake won the CBC Nonfiction Prize in 2017 and the CBC Short Story Prize in 2013. She is a graduate of the Creative Writing MFA Program at the University of Guelph, and her work has appeared in journals, magazines, and newspapers across Canada. Her debut novel, Proof I Was Here, is forthcoming from Wolsak & Wynn’s Buckrider Books in May 2019. She currently lives in Toronto where she is working on a memoir-in-essays called Everything I’m About to Say Is a Lie. The title refers to the recommended way to answer a phone that’s been tapped (as Blake’s once was). Her memoir draws on this and other experiences ranging from the criminal to the comical as she examines the singular power of a true story and the license we sometimes take to tell one.Kirk Angus Johnson — University of King’s College / Dalhousie Johnson is of both Metis and African ancestry. After graduating from Acadia University and an early career in theatre, he attended Concordia University in Montreal to pursue an MFA in Creative Writing. In keeping with the military traditions within his family, Johnson enrolled in the Canadian Forces as an Infantry Officer and was deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan in 2010. Now released from the military, Johnson is returning to a career in writing. He resides in Three Mile Plains, NS, his childhood home, and is in the MFA in Creative Nonfiction at University of King’s College in Halifax. Some Kind of Hero is a compelling account of the circumstances leading to Afghan vet Lionel Desmond’s tragic 2017 murder/suicide, and the lessons we need to learn from it.Miles Steyn — University of Victoria Steyn was born in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa and raised in Vancouver. His creative nonfiction has appeared in Existere, The Xanadu Anthology, Unsubscribe Magazine, Gold Literary Magazine, and his essay “Wire to the Sky” was short-listed for EVENT Magazine‘s Creative Nonfiction Contest. In 2018, Steyn’s essay “From Clay” was long-listed for the CBC Nonfiction Prize. Expanding on the earlier essay, Wire to the Sky, Steyn’s first book of nonfiction is a genre-bending memoir, told through letters from a brother to his late sister, about race, nationality, and the loss of family.Joshua Whitehead — University of Calgary Whitehead is an Oji-Cree, Two-Spirit storyteller and academic from Peguis First Nation on Treaty 1 territory in Manitoba. He is currently working toward a Ph.D. in Indigenous literature and cultures at the University of Calgary. In 2016, his poem “mihkokwaniy” won Canada’s History Award for Aboriginal Arts and Stories (for writers aged 19–29), which included a residency at the Banff Centre. His 2018 novel, Jonny Appleseed, was shortlisted for the Governor General’s Award for Fiction. His non-fiction book, Making Love with The Land, is a braid of forms that ruminates on topics such as Indigeneity, queerness, mental health, body dysmorphia, and chronic pain through a variety of literary forms, including horror, speculative fiction, poetry, and confession.last_img read more

Nonmedical cannabis retail stores in Fort St John continue to wait

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – With non-medical cannabis retail stores opening their doors around the region, the question is when will the first shop open their doors in FSJ.With five shops submitting their applications to City Council and being approved, the shops of FSJ seem to be in a holding pattern in different states of assessment with the Government.The third applicant in FSJ is Cannabis Corner to be located at #2 – 10108 100 Street, in the location of the old Playtime Toys. Once that is approved staff can be hired and product ordering from the BCLCB can begin. “We will open within days of receiving conditional approval,” shared Lepine. Danny Lepine, one of the three partners of Cannabis Corner says, “We have completed our security screening interviews a few weeks ago tho we have heard nothing further. We have no idea as to when we may receive approval,”Lepine is waiting to receive conditional approval so the company can go ahead and prepare the store floorplan as designed. There is then a physical store inspection to confirm that the store matches the floorplans submitted.center_img With retailers already opening their doors in Pouce Coupe, Tumbler Ridge and Dawson Creek there is anticipation in Fort St. John to do the same.last_img read more

Depression drives bizman to end life

first_imgGreater Noida: A 40-year-old businessman allegedly committed suicide inside his flat in Assotech society in Zeta-1 sector of Greater Noida on Monday morning. Police have not received any suicide note from the spot.According to police, the deceased has been identified as Ravindra Malik, a native of Panipat district in Haryana. Cops said that Malik, owner of a polyethete bags manufacturing company in sector Ecotech-III of Greater Noida, was living in flat number ST-013 along with his family. However, he was alone at his house when he committed suicide as the family had gone to native place in Panipat. Also Read – Bangla Sahib Gurudwara bans use of all types of plastic itemsPolice said that the body was first spotted by Malik’s wife and his father-in-law on Monday morning. “A Police control room(PCR) call was received around 8:50 am on Monday by Malik’s wife who returned home from Panipat along with her father. As she came back home, she found the door locked from inside. Even after making repeated attempts when no one responded from inside the house, she alerted the security guards of society. The guards broke open the door and found Malik hanging with the ceiling fan inside his room. Immediately they alerted police and a team rushed to the spot,” said Jitendra Kumar Tripathi, Station in-charge of Industrial area police station in Surajpur. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderPolice said that Malik took the extreme step under mental depression. “Victim’s family members told police that he was under extreme metal stress from past few months while he also suffered a loss in his business and was under huge debts. As of now we have not received any complaint into the matter while the body was handed over to family members after getting the postmortem done,” added Tripathi. Malik is survived by his wife and two teenaged children.last_img read more

CM 85 jobs for locals if Delhi becomes full state

first_imgNew Delhi: Delhi Chief Minister and AAP national convenor Arvind Kejriwal on Tuesday said that after Delhi becomes a full state, the AAP-led government would come up with 2 lakh government jobs and 85 per cent of those jobs would be specifically for citizens of Delhi. In support of AAP candidates on Tuesday, the Chief Minister addressed nearly three rallies across the constituencies like North-West, Chandi Chowk and New Delhi.”Delhi government has 2 lakh vacancies but we have no power to give employment. You give us all the seven seats and I promise you that within two years Delhi will become a full state thereafter we will give 2 lakh employment and 85 per cent of that will be only for the Delhiites,” said the Chief Minister. From healthcare, housing, electricity, education, the safety of women to stopping sealing, Kejriwal made a host of promises if Delhi becomes a full state, which will be possible, he claimed, if Delhi chooses AAP candidates from all seven Lok Sabha seats. “While Delhi pays Rs. 1.5 lakh crore in income-tax every year, the Centre gives it only Rs 325 crore,” the chief minister said. Delhi government would have made many more schools and hospitals if the Centre had allocated more funds, he added. “Some works can’t be done till Delhi becomes a full state. Women feel unsafe and there is hooliganism everywhere because Delhi Police doesn’t listen to people,” CM Kejriwal said. “The police come under the PM and no one can meet the PM,” said the CM. If Delhi Police reports to Delhi government, he said, the law and order system will be such that girls will be able to go out at 11 pm without any fear. Sealing will also be stopped in 24 hours, CM Kejriwal promised. “For all these years, it is the Delhi Development Authority (DDA) that is responsible for housing in the city… and it has done nothing but to cut plots and hand it over to builders. If you make AAP win, then in 10 years, we will provide houses for every voter family in cheap and easy instalments,” he said. While also assuring 85 per cent reservation in jobs and colleges, the CM said that on gaining full statehood AAP would open many colleges and universities that even those Delhiites who get 60% would manage to get admission in good colleges. CM Kejriwal also alleged that the BJP and Congress people try to obstruct his rallies in Delhi.last_img read more

Mayawati calls Congress BJP birds of same feather

first_imgLucknow: Bahujan Samaj Party supremo Mayawati on Wednesday hit out at the ruling BJP and the Congress for their ‘garibi hatao’ promise calling it a bluff. She accused both of the parties of being “birds of the same feather” who betray people, despite such eradicate poverty slogans which comes to nothing after the votes are over. Mayawati said: “Ruling BJP calling Congress slogan of Garibi Hatao 2.0 a bluff, is true. “But is poll bluff and reneging of poll promises the sole domain of the BJP?” Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details “In fact BJP and Congress party are both birds of the same feather. They betraying the interests of the poor, labourers, farmers and others,” Mayawati tweeted. The Dalit leader’s remarks came after the ruling BJP described Congress’ minimum income scheme ‘NYAY’ announced by party chief Rahul Gandhi for elimination of poverty a “bluff”. Gandhi had on Monday announced to give Rs 72,000 per annum to 25 crore poor families of the country. The BSP, which had earlier announced no alliance with the Congress across the country is fighting the 2019 elections along with the Samajwadi Party (SP) and the Rashtriya Lok Dal (RLD). Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday The BSP, which scored a nil in the 2014 elections is contesting on 38 out of 80 seats in Uttar Pradesh. The SP which won five seats is contesting on 37 and it’s other alliance partner, the RLD is contesting on three seats. The SP-BSP-RLD alliance has left two seats of Amethi and Rae Bareli for the Congress in the state. The BJP-led NDA had won 73 seats from Uttar Pradesh in 2014. The seven phased Lok Sabha polls are scheduled from April 11 to May 19. Counting of votes will take place on May 23.last_img read more

Kolkata Police uses mankading fiasco to spread message of road safety

first_imgKolkata: Kolkata Police has used the recent ‘mankad’ episode in the ongoing Indian Premier League (IPL) to deliver the message of road safety awareness through their Facebook page.Kings XI Punjab skipper Ravichandran Ashwin had ‘mankaded’ Jos Buttler of Rajasthan Royals at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium in Jaipur on Monday, which has been evoking divided opinions among the cricket fraternity on social media. The “mankading” dismissal followed a batting collapse as the Rajasthan team collapsed from 108 for 1 to 170 all out and lost the match by 14 runs. It may be mentioned that Buttler was in a destructive mood during the match and had contributed 69 runs off 43 balls before being dismissed. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaKolkata Police has clubbed the picture of Buttler’s dismissal along with a photo which showed a car crossing the stop line on the road, with a statement which reads: “Whether crease or road, you will regret if you cross the line (crease a hok ba rastay, aage perole postay).” “Social media has always been an effective tool for us in creating awareness about road safety and security as the young generation is very active on the social networking sites. These creative ideas have a good impact on them as comments and shares have been flooding our Facebook page,” a senior official of KP’s Traffic department said. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayThis is, however, not the first time when KP has used action from the cricket field to strengthen their campaign of traffic safety. When Cheteshwar Pujara scored a ton at Adelaide against Australia in December 2018, KP had used his century celebration picture and clubbed it with a picture of a person wearing seat belt while driving his car. The picture had “Defense should be like Pujara,” written on it. The Jaipur Police had used the image of Jasprit Bumrah bowling a no-ball to Fakhar Zaman on a billboard as a means of traffic awareness in 2017. The caption of the picture read: “Don’t cross the line. You know it can be costly.” This, however, didn’t go down well with Bumrah, who had criticised Jaipur Police for the same.last_img read more